"When a group violently attacks other people or attacks a public place in a way that puts other people's lives or safety in jeopardy, that's a severe crime," says Greg Magarian. (Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images )

Law prof.: Mob attack at US Capitol was ‘insurrection’

"The takeover of the US Capitol... incited by the president of the United States and his agents, was terrorism, insurrection, and an attempted violent coup."

Neil Schoenherr-WUSTL • futurity
Jan. 8, 2021 5 minSource

When a group violently attacks a government institution in an effort to change the lawful governmental order, it is insurrection, says an expert on the US Constitution.

“We’re experiencing a period of public political protest like nothing in recent memory,” says Greg Magarian , professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis. “It has never been more important than it is at this moment to distinguish among different kinds of public political action.”

“When a group violently attacks a government institution in an effort to change the lawful governmental order, that’s insurrection. It’s terrorism.”

Protest is when people assemble and speak lawfully in public, he says. “Protesters may form in large groups. They may use harsh language. They may scream at law enforcement officers. That’s all still protest. It’s all perfectly lawful and Constitutionally protected.”

Civil disobedience is when people nonviolently break the law to make a political point, Magarian says.

“Some acts of civil disobedience, like blocking traffic, generally are tolerated by law enforcement,” he says. “Other acts of civil disobedience, like occupation of government buildings, usually result in arrests. Most civil disobedience does not result in serious legal punishment. Our system, in responding to civil disobedience, generally tries to strike a balance between maintaining law and order and leaving ample space for public political expression.”

Deliberate damage to property is unlawful, he says.

“Most proponents of civil disobedience would say that breaking windows or spraying graffiti on buildings is not justified,” he says. “Property damage usually results in prosecution if law enforcement can identify the perpetrators. Some more serious property damage, like arson, can result in very serious criminal penalties.

“However, none of those categories, not even property damage, approaches what happened inside the Capitol barricades and the Capitol building January 6,” he says. “When a group violently attacks other people or attacks a public place in a way that puts other people’s lives or safety in jeopardy, that’s a severe crime.

“It’s a violent riot, an attack. When a group violently attacks a government institution in an effort to change the lawful governmental order, that’s insurrection. It’s terrorism .”

Magarian points to the Constitutional rights to properly assemble displayed in many summertime protests across the United States in response to the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor.

However, he pointed out examples of where such protests and rights went astray and turned into illegal activities, as in other attacks on federal- or state-owned institutions—specifically, when organized groups staked a claim to such an area.

“The Bundy family takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in 2016 was terrorism and insurrection,” Magarian says. “The militia takeover of the Michigan State Capitol in April was terrorism and insurrection. The militia shutdown of the Oregon Statehouse in June 2019 was terrorism and insurrection.

“The takeover of the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, incited by the president of the United States and his agents, was terrorism, insurrection, and an attempted violent coup.”

Source: Washington University in St. Louis

The post Law prof.: Mob attack at US Capitol was ‘insurrection’ appeared first on Futurity .


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