Scientists at work: New recordings of ultrasonic seal calls hint at sonar-like abilities

Microphones on the seafloor recorded life under the Antarctic ice for two years – inadvertently catching seal trills and chirps that are above the range of human hearing. Could they be for navigation?

Lisa Munger, Instructor of Natural Sciences, University of Oregon • conversation
Feb. 9, 2021 ~9 min

The hopeful return of polar whales

Whales are rediscovering their old haunts in the Arctic and Southern oceans after centuries of hunting.

Lauren McWhinnie, Assistant Professor in Marine Geography, Heriot-Watt University • conversation
Jan. 1, 2021 ~7 min

Seals are chirping under Antarctic ice but we can’t hear it

Weddell seals are making all kinds of noise under the Antarctic ice, but at sound frequencies humans can't hear. Listen to an adjusted sample.

Jim Barlow-Oregon • futurity
Dec. 22, 2020 ~6 min

Ice sheets ‘talk’ to each other across the planet

"Our results highlight how interconnected the Earth system is, with changes in one part of the planet driving changes in another."

Katherine Gombay-McGill • futurity
Nov. 30, 2020 ~6 min

Ice sheets ‘talk’ to each other across the planet

"Our results highlight how interconnected the Earth system is, with changes in one part of the planet driving changes in another."

Katherine Gombay-McGill • futurity
Nov. 30, 2020 ~6 min

When ice sheets melt, it’s a seesaw effect

Ice sheets thousands of kilometers apart influence each other through sea level changes.

Juan Siliezar • harvard
Nov. 25, 2020 ~7 min

Warm rivers of air punch big holes in Antarctic sea ice

Warm, moist rivers of air have a lot to do with massive holes in sea ice in Antarctica's Weddell Sea, a new study shows.

Todd Bates-Rutgers • futurity
Nov. 13, 2020 ~5 min

200 years ago, people discovered Antarctica – and promptly began profiting by slaughtering some of its animals to near extinction

For 200 years, a small number of countries have exploited the marine wildlife of Antarctica, often with devastating impact on their populations.

Alessandro Antonello, Senior Research Fellow in History, Flinders University • conversation
Nov. 13, 2020 ~8 min

Huge toothy birds once soared over penguins

Fossils from extinct pelagornithids indicate that they'd dwarf the 11.5-foot wingspan of today's largest bird, the wandering albatross.

Robert Sanders-UC Berkeley • futurity
Oct. 29, 2020 ~8 min

Giant 'toothed' birds flew over Antarctica 40 million to 50 million years ago

Paleontologists have discovered fossil remains belonging to an enormous 'toothed' bird that lived for a period of about 60 million years after dinosaurs.

Peter A. Kloess, Doctoral Candidate, Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Oct. 27, 2020 ~7 min

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