When did humans first go to war?

A war with Neanderthals makes a compelling narrative but the evidence is limited is best.

John Stewart, Associate Professor of Evolutionary Palaeoecology, Bournemouth University • conversation
Nov. 9, 2020 ~8 min

archaeology neanderthals fossils war homo-sapiens

Did prehistoric women hunt? New research suggests so

New research is challenging the hypothesis that men did the hunting in prehistoric societies.

Annemieke Milks, Honorary Research Fellow, UCL • conversation
Nov. 4, 2020 ~5 min

archaeology women hunting hunter-gatherer pleistocene-era

Cahokian culture spread across eastern North America 1,000 years ago in an early example of diaspora

Five centuries before Columbus arrived, migrants were spreading across North America, carrying their culture with them and mixing with those they encountered in new places.

Jayur Mehta, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Florida State University • conversation
Oct. 30, 2020 ~11 min

anthropology archaeology native-americans human-migration diaspora pre-columbian

Why some ancient Egyptian ink contained lead

New research uncovers lead compounds in red and black inks on ancient Egyptian papyrus. Here's why that's notable.

Carsten Munk Hansen-U. Copenhagen • futurity
Oct. 28, 2020 ~6 min

archaeology lead writing egypt society-and-culture

Clovis only made stone tools for about 300 years

The Clovis, some of North America's oldest inhabitants, probably only made stone tools for about 300 years, new research shows.

Keith Randall-Texas A&M • futurity
Oct. 23, 2020 ~5 min

archaeology science-and-technology early-humans ancient-history stone-tools north-america

Turbulent environment set the stage for leaps in human evolution and technology 320,000 years ago

A new environmental record for a prehistoric site in Kenya helped researchers figure out how external conditions influenced which of our ancient ancestors lived there, with what way of life.

Richard Potts, Director of the Human Origins Program, Smithsonian Institution • conversation
Oct. 21, 2020 ~11 min

anthropology human-evolution archaeology fossils homo-sapiens paleoanthropology stone-tools human-origins middle-stone-age ancient-sediments human-fossils sediment sediment-cores

Eurasia’s oldest balls suggest warriors worked out

Three leather balls from a cemetery in China are the oldest known yet from Eurasia. They indicate warriors on horseback worked to keep fit.

U. Zurich • futurity
Oct. 15, 2020 ~5 min

china archaeology horses sports society-and-culture burials

Archaeologists determined the step-by-step path taken by the first people to settle the Caribbean islands

Did people settle these islands by traveling north from South America, or in the other direction? Reanalyzing data from artifacts discovered decades ago provides a definitive answer.

Scott Fitzpatrick, Professor of Anthropology + Associate Director, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, University of Oregon • conversation
Sept. 29, 2020 ~10 min

archaeology caribbean cuba radiocarbon-dating jamaica islands human-migration trinidad human-settlements artifacts human-settlement

Ancient DNA is revealing the genetic landscape of people who first settled East Asia

By studying the DNA of people who lived in East Asia thousands of years ago, scientists are starting to untangle how the region was populated.

Melinda A. Yang, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Richmond • conversation
Sept. 15, 2020 ~11 min

ancient-dna hunter-gatherers china agriculture archaeology genes genomics southeast-asia rice adna siberia paleoanthropology human-migration east-asia hunter-gatherer start-of-agriculture paleogenomics

Ceramic pots may ‘remember’ ancient meals

The details of ancient recipes remain in residues in cookware, new research finds.

Yasmin Anwar-UC Berkeley • futurity
Sept. 14, 2020 ~6 min

archaeology food society-and-culture

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