Make drones sound less annoying by factoring in humans at the design stage

We've devised a way to factor in noise annoyance levels in drone design.

Antonio J Torija Martinez, Lecturer in Acoustic Engineering, University of Salford • conversation
Dec. 21, 2020 ~5 min

drones noise-pollution noise unmanned-aerial-vehicles drone-delivery civil-aviation

Scientists suggest US embassies were hit with high-power microwaves – here's how the weapons work

High-power microwave weapons are useful for disabling electronics. They might also be behind the ailments suffered by US diplomats and CIA agents in Cuba and China.

Edl Schamiloglu, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Associate Dean for Research and Innovation, School of Engineering, University of New Mexico, University of New Mexico • conversation
Dec. 10, 2020 ~8 min

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‘Smellicopter’ uses a live moth antenna to hunt for scents

A new tiny drone called Smellicopter uses a live moth antenna to navigate toward smells. It can also avoid obstcles in the air.

Sarah McQuate-Washington • futurity
Dec. 9, 2020 ~8 min

sensors drones moths biomimicry science-and-technology

New drone technology advances volcanic monitoring

Specially-adapted drones, developed by an international team involving scientists from the University of Cambridge, are transforming how we forecast eruptions

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Oct. 30, 2020 ~6 min

climate-change carbon volcano drones

Backpack-toting moths can drop sensors where people can’t

Tiny sensors that weigh less than jellybeans and ride on the back of moths may help researchers study places too dangerous for people to get to.

Sarah McQuate-Washington • futurity
Oct. 12, 2020 ~5 min

insects sensors drones moths science-and-technology

Some bees are born curious while others are more single-minded – new research hints at how the hive picks which flowers to feast on

New research suggests individual bees are born with one of two learning styles – either curious or focused. Their genetic tendency has implications for how the hive works together.

Chelsea Cook, Assistant Professor in Biology, Marquette University • conversation
Oct. 5, 2020 ~7 min

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Robots go their own way deep in the ocean

Firms are building robots that can survey the seabed and underwater structures without human help.

By Ben Morris • bbcnews
Aug. 13, 2020 ~7 min

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How to hide from a drone – the subtle art of 'ghosting' in the age of surveillance

Avoiding drones' prying eyes can be as complicated as donning a high-tech hoodie and as simple as ducking under a tree.

Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick, Associate Professor of Political Sociology, University of San Diego • conversation
July 28, 2020 ~7 min

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With the help of trained dolphins, our team of researchers is building a specialized drone to help us study dolphins in the wild

Wild dolphins are fast, smart and hard to study, but it is important to understand how human actions affect their health. So we are building a drone to sample hormones from the blowholes of dolphins.

Jason Bruck, Teaching Assistant Professor of Integrative Biology, Oklahoma State University • conversation
July 1, 2020 ~9 min

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Watch an acrobatic drone pull off great stunts

A new drone can pull off acrobatic maneuvers like barrel rolls or loops. More than just looking cool, it could be a step to autonomous flying robots.

U. Zurich • futurity
June 23, 2020 ~5 min

robots sensors drones algorithms featured science-and-technology flight

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