COVID-19 crisis in Los Angeles: Why activating 'crisis standards of care' is crucial for overwhelmed hospitals

States and hospitals are starting to declare 'crisis standards of care' as the pandemic floods their ERs. The orders have consequences – both good and bad, as a medical ethicist explains.

Maria Howard, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Gonzaga University • conversation
Jan. 6, 2021 ~8 min

health public-health covid-19 coronavirus ethics pandemic disaster crisis california los-angeles medical-ethics

In a time of social and environmental crisis, Aldo Leopold's call for a 'land ethic' is still relevant

Jan. 11 marks the birthday of conservationist Aldo Leopold (1887-1948), who called for thinking about land as a living community to protect, not a resource to exploit.

Curt D. Meine, Adjunct Associate Professor of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison • conversation
Jan. 5, 2021 ~9 min

conservation ethics ecology environmental-justice racism us-history land restoration-ecology environmental-movement wilderness

The cold supply chain can't reach everywhere – that's a big problem for equitable COVID-19 vaccination

So far, the only COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use need to be kept frozen. But there are many places in the world that can't support a cold supply chain.

Charles M. Schweik, Professor of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
Jan. 4, 2021 ~7 min

public-health covid-19 coronavirus vaccines sars-cov-2 cdc cold-chain pfizer health-equity moderna centers-for-disease-control medical-ethics vaccine-distribution

To protect research subjects, account for the internet

The ethics rules that protect subjects of field research are no match for the internet. A new essay calls for revising the rules to better protect people.

Jill Kimball-Brown • futurity
Dec. 3, 2020 ~8 min

social-media politics ethics internet research science-and-technology

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma may settle legal claims with a new 'public trust' that would still be dedicated to profit

The government has tried to harness profit-driven drugmaking to serve public health before. The results were underwhelming.

David Herzberg, Associate Professor of History, University at Buffalo • conversation
Oct. 21, 2020 ~10 min

history opioids philanthropy-and-nonprofits opioid-crisis oxycodone business-ethics oxycontin corporate-culture sackler-family purdue-pharma opioid-litigation

A global collaboration to move artificial intelligence principles to practice

Convened by the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing, the AI Policy Forum will develop frameworks and tools for governments and companies to implement concrete policies.

MIT Schwarzman College of Computing • mit
Oct. 19, 2020 ~5 min

machine-learning artificial-intelligence ethics industry policy law research government global computer-science-and-technology technology-and-society algorithms collaboration mit-schwarzman-college-of-computing

Experts consider the ethical implications of new technology

Faculty from the Computer Science and Philosophy departments join forces in a successful new undergraduate initiative, Embedded EthiCS, to change the way computer scientists think about the ethical implications of new technology.

Christina Pazzanese • harvard
Oct. 16, 2020 ~15 min

science-technology computer-science ethics harvard-john-a-paulson-school-of-engineering-and-applied-sciences harvard-college barbara-grosz radhika-nagpal alison-simmons embedded-ethics philosophy christina-pazzanese faculty-of-arts-and-science david-grant jeffrey-behrends

VIP patients can be a headache for their doctors

When a celebrity, politician or other influential person checks in, a health care team can feel pressured to give in to a VIP's wishes.

Nancy Nielsen, Clinical Professor of Medicine and Senior Associate Dean for Health Policy, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York • conversation
Oct. 7, 2020 ~6 min

covid-19 coronavirus donald-trump physicians medical-care patients celebrities medical-ethics president-donald-j-trump

How to read coronavirus news and learn what you actually need to know about staying safe in the pandemic

Journalists use real people's stories to 'humanize' the news. But these tales – whether harrowing or heartwarming – can be misleading about the pandemic's greatest threats.

Thomas J. Hrach, Associate Professor, Department of Journalism and Strategic Media, University of Memphis • conversation
Sept. 2, 2020 ~7 min

coronavirus media cognition memory pandemic journalism news media-literacy human-brain media-ethics media-studies

Challenge trials for a coronavirus vaccine are unethical – except for in one unlikely scenario

Challenge trials – purposefully exposing volunteers to the coronavirus – could speed up the development of a vaccine. But there are serious ethical concerns with this approach.

Ben Bramble, Visiting Fellow, Princeton University • conversation
Aug. 24, 2020 ~8 min

covid-19 coronavirus ethics risk pandemic philosophy vaccines sars-cov-2 viruses lockdown bioethics essential-workers

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