Did disease buy time before Neanderthal extinction?

A new theory about Neanderthal extinction points to disease transmission as the culprit—both for their end, and for why it came about so slowly.

Ker Than-Stanford | Nov. 11, 2019 | futurity
~5 mins   

Tags: society-and-culture early-humans extinction immune-systems neanderthals

At-home HPV tests up cervical cancer screening

"...mailing unsolicited self-collection kits for HPV testing increased cervical cancer screening by 50% in women who were underscreened..."

U. Washington | Nov. 8, 2019 | futurity
~4 mins   

Tags: health-and-medicine cancer cervical-cancer human-papillomavirus-hpv medical-tests

Investigating the power of group think

Political science doctoral student Clara Vandeweerdt studies how identity shapes beliefs on complex political topics such as climate change.

Leda Zimmerman | MIT Political Science | Nov. 7, 2019 | mit
~7 mins   

Tags: political-science media-lab research behavior media students graduate postdoctoral social-sciences school-of-humanities-arts-and-social-sciences school-of-architecture-and-planning politics science-communications

'Astonishing' fossil ape discovery revealed

Fossils of a newly-discovered ancient ape could give clues to how walking on two feet evolved.

By Helen Briggs | Nov. 6, 2019 | bbcnews
~4 mins   

Tags: evolution animals human-evolution orangutans fossils

System provides cooling with no electricity

Passive device relies on a layer of material that blocks incoming sunlight but lets heat radiate away.

David Chandler | MIT News Office | Oct. 30, 2019 | mit
~8 mins   

Tags: research mechanical-engineering school-of-engineering misti renewable-energy sustainability department-of-energy-doe school-of-humanities-arts-and-social-sciences

J-PAL North America announces five new partnerships with state and local governments

New partners will work with J-PAL to develop rigorous evaluations of policies related to criminal justice, health, housing stability, and economic security.

J-PAL North America | Oct. 28, 2019 | mit
~11 mins   

Tags: abdul-latif-jameel-poverty-action-lab-j-pal economics school-of-humanities-arts-and-social-sciences policy poverty government funding research

Origin of modern humans 'traced to Botswana'

Scientists say the possible homeland of all humans alive today is an area south of the Zambesi River.

By Helen Briggs | Oct. 28, 2019 | bbcnews
~4 mins   

Tags: botswana genetics human-evolution fossils

Collision course: a geological mystery in the Himalayas

MIT geologists use paleomagnetism to determine the chain of events that resulted in the Himalayan mountains, with the support of MISTI-India.

Fernanda Ferreira | School of Science | Oct. 28, 2019 | mit
~6 mins   

Tags: eaps misti environment geology planetary-science plate-tectonics climate research students school-of-science school-of-humanities-arts-and-social-sciences

Putting the “bang” in the Big Bang

Physicists simulate critical “reheating” period that kickstarted the Big Bang in the universe’s first fractions of a second.

Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office | Oct. 24, 2019 | mit
~9 mins   

Tags: astrophysics computer-modeling physics cosmic-inflation research program-in-sts national-science-foundation-nsf school-of-science school-of-humanities-arts-and-social-sciences department-of-energy-doe

Why glue isn’t proof of Neanderthal smarts

Neanderthals made birch bark glue, which has been considered evidence of their sophistication. But what if it's actually super easy to make?

Kathleen Hamilton-NYU | Oct. 22, 2019 | futurity
~3 mins   

Tags: featured society-and-culture adhesives early-humans neanderthals

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