Fences have big effects on land and wildlife around the world that are rarely measured

Millions of miles of fences crisscross the Earth's surface. They divide ecosystems and affect wild species in ways that often are harmful, but are virtually unstudied.

Wenjing Xu, PhD Candidate in Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Nov. 30, 2020 ~10 min

africa ecology australia infrastructure wildlife livestock us-mexico-border-wall ecosystems roads habitat-fragmentation invasive-species predators us-west fences animal-migration

How pigs and manure helped bring down East Germany

The author of a new book argues that pig farming and manure pollution played a significant role in the end of Communism in East Germany.

Sandra Knispel-U. Rochester • futurity
Nov. 19, 2020 ~13 min

pollution history agriculture livestock germany pigs society-and-culture

Will Colorado bring back wolves? It's up to voters

For the first time in the US, a ballot measure will ask voters whether to restore wolves to a place where they've been eradicated. Coloradans have strong views on both sides.

Kevin Crooks, Professor of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology , Colorado State University • conversation
Oct. 16, 2020 ~11 min

livestock ranchers endangered-species colorado human-wildlife-conflict hunting wolves carnivores apex-predators us-west us-elections-2020 referendum ecological-restoration

Sick livestock up emissions and vice versa

The relationship between sick livestock with parasite diseases and climate change may be a "vicious cycle," say researchers.

Talia Ogliore-WUSTL • futurity
Oct. 12, 2020 ~6 min

climate-change methane livestock emissions ecosystems cows earth-and-environment

Sick livestock up emissions and vice versa

The relationship between sick livestock with parasite diseases and climate change may be a "vicious cycle," say researchers.

Talia Ogliore-WUSTL • futurity
Oct. 12, 2020 ~6 min

climate-change methane livestock emissions ecosystems cows earth-and-environment

Nobel Prize for chemistry honors exquisitely precise gene-editing technique, CRISPR – a gene engineer explains how it works

The tools to rewrite the genetic code to improve crops and livestock, or to treat genetic diseases, has revolutionized biology. A CRISPR engineer explains why this technology won the Nobel, and its potential.

Piyush K. Jain, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering, UF Health Cancer Center, University of Florida • conversation
Oct. 7, 2020 ~8 min

 crispr  nobel-prize  agriculture  gene-editing  nobel-prize-2020  nobel-prize-in-chemistry  gene-edited-babies  gene-edited-livestock

Rural America is more vulnerable to COVID-19 than cities are, and it's starting to show

Being able to identify communities that are susceptible to the pandemic ahead of time would allow officials to target public health interventions to slow the spread of the infection and avoid deaths.

David J. Peters, Associate Professor of Rural Sociology, Iowa State University • conversation
June 18, 2020 ~10 min

health covid-19 coronavirus livestock us-midwest rural mitigation slaughterhouses rural-policies

Why it's wrong to blame livestock farms for coronavirus

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, some critics say livestock farms promote diseases that spread from animals to humans. An animal scientist explains how well-run farms work to keep that from happening.

Alison Van Eenennaam, Researcher, Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis • conversation
May 13, 2020 ~10 min

agriculture livestock swine-flu animal-welfare zoonotic-viruses veterinary-medicine pigs poultry biosecurity veterinary-science cows chickens

Climate change could wreck traditional sheep farming in Wales

Recent summers have offered a taste of things to come for Welsh farmers.

Mariecia Fraser, Reader in Upland Agroecology, Aberystwyth University • conversation
May 4, 2020 ~6 min

climate-change agriculture heat-wave livestock drought grass wales sheep-farming

East African herders drank milk 5,000 years ago

Traces of milk in ancient pots indicate that east African herders were consuming dairy 5,000 years ago.

Talia Ogliore-WUSTL • futurity
April 17, 2020 ~4 min

agriculture archaeology food kenya livestock tanzania science-and-technology milk dairy

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