Magnetic induction cooking can cut your kitchen's carbon footprint

Shifting from fossil fuels to electricity is climate-friendly, but serious cooks don't think much of electric stoves. Will induction cooking finally catch on as an alternative?

Kenneth McLeod, Professor of Systems Science, and Director, Clinical Science and Engineering Research Laboratory, Binghamton University, State University of New York • conversation
Dec. 23, 2020 ~9 min

climate-change energy electricity cooking natural-gas magnetic-fields electromagnetism household-appliances

Small study reveals details of brain damage in COVID-19 patients

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers examined six patients using a specialized magnetic resonance technique and found that COVID-19 patients with neurological symptoms show some of the same metabolic disturbances in the brain as patients who have suffered oxygen deprivation from other causes.

Harvard Gazette • harvard
Nov. 18, 2020 ~4 min

covid-19 health-medicine massachusetts-general-hospital brain-damage 3-tesla-magnetic-resonance-spectroscopy leukoencephalopathy neurological-injury oxygen-deprivation

How do geese know how to fly south for the winter?

Geese honk loudly and point their bills toward the sky when they're ready to start the migration. Here's how they know it's time, how they navigate and how they conserve energy on the grueling trip.

Tom Langen, Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
Nov. 16, 2020 ~8 min

birds migration ornithology curious-kids curious-kids-us feathers migratory-birds bird-migration animal-navigation flying geese magnetic-compass drafting fall magnetic-north bird-flight

Magnetars may be behind some fast radio bursts

Researchers may have pinpointed a source of some fast radio bursts. They may come from neutron stars with extremely powerful magnetic fields called magnetars.

McGill University • futurity
Nov. 13, 2020 ~4 min

space stars featured science-and-technology magnetic-fields


Magnetism of Himalayan rocks reveals the mountains' complex tectonic history

Earth's magnetic field locks information into lava as it cools into rock. Millions of years later, scientists can decipher this magnetic data to build geologic timelines and maps.

Craig Robert Martin, Ph.D. Student in Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology • conversation
Nov. 2, 2020 ~9 min

geology lava plate-tectonics india magnetism rocks mountains himalayas magnetic-fields mantle earths-mantle tectonic-plates subduction paleomagnetism

Watch a tiny robot back flip through a real colon

A microrobot as small as a few human hairs can do flips through the colon to deliver drugs. Check out the video to see it in action.

Kayla Wiles-Purdue • futurity
Oct. 16, 2020 ~6 min

robots drug-delivery featured health-and-medicine magnetic-fields

Team creates ‘holy grail’ of superconductors

"...with this kind of technology, you can take society into a superconducting society where you'll never need things like batteries again."

Bob Marcotte-U. Rochester • futurity
Oct. 15, 2020 ~8 min

physics electricity materials-science superconductors temperature magnetism featured science-and-technology

Life on Earth: why we may have the Moon's now defunct magnetic field to thank for it

The Earth's magnetic field was most likely weaker when life evolved on our planet than it is today.

Jon Mound, Associate Professor of Geophysics, University of Leeds • conversation
Oct. 15, 2020 ~5 min

evolution atmosphere moon earth sun magnetism magnetic-fields life-on-earth solar-winds

Superconductor technology for smaller, sooner fusion

MIT-Commonwealth Fusion Systems demonstration of new superconducting cable is a key step on the high-field path to compact fusion.

Leda Zimmerman | Plasma Science and Fusion Center • mit
Oct. 13, 2020 ~9 min

energy industry superconductors research renewable-energy school-of-engineering global faculty collaboration nuclear-science-and-engineering magnets alternative-energy plasma-science-and-fusion-center fusion cern

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