Cities can help migrating birds on their way by planting more trees and turning lights off at night

Cities are danger zones for migrating birds, but there are ways to help feathered visitors pass through more safely

Frank La Sorte, Research Associate, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Cornell University • conversation
Jan. 15, 2021 ~9 min

birds migration trees citizen-science parks migratory-birds sustainable-cities light-pollution pavement urban-trees ebird

The Marshall Islands could be wiped out by climate change – and their colonial history limits their ability to save themselves

Climate change is a true existential threat for small island nations, but the US has done little to help the Marshall Islands, which it administered for decades.

Caroline E. Ferguson, PhD candidate in Environment and Resources, Stanford University • conversation
Dec. 11, 2020 ~10 min

climate-change climate sea-level-rise flooding colonialism storm-surge climate-change-adaptation nuclear-weapons pacific-ocean marshall-islands forced-migration small-island-states

Fences have big effects on land and wildlife around the world that are rarely measured

Millions of miles of fences crisscross the Earth's surface. They divide ecosystems and affect wild species in ways that often are harmful, but are virtually unstudied.

Wenjing Xu, PhD Candidate in Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Nov. 30, 2020 ~10 min

africa ecology australia infrastructure wildlife livestock us-mexico-border-wall ecosystems roads habitat-fragmentation invasive-species predators us-west fences animal-migration

How do geese know how to fly south for the winter?

Geese honk loudly and point their bills toward the sky when they're ready to start the migration. Here's how they know it's time, how they navigate and how they conserve energy on the grueling trip.

Tom Langen, Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
Nov. 16, 2020 ~8 min

birds migration ornithology curious-kids curious-kids-us feathers migratory-birds bird-migration animal-navigation flying geese magnetic-compass drafting fall magnetic-north bird-flight

Cahokian culture spread across eastern North America 1,000 years ago in an early example of diaspora

Five centuries before Columbus arrived, migrants were spreading across North America, carrying their culture with them and mixing with those they encountered in new places.

Jayur Mehta, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Florida State University • conversation
Oct. 30, 2020 ~11 min

anthropology archaeology native-americans human-migration diaspora pre-columbian

Climate migration: what the research shows is very different from the alarmist headlines

Climate migrants still tend to move to places they know or have connections to through their social networks.

Ingrid Boas, Associate Professor, Wageningen University • conversation
Oct. 7, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change migration climate-refugees climate-migration

Archaeologists determined the step-by-step path taken by the first people to settle the Caribbean islands

Did people settle these islands by traveling north from South America, or in the other direction? Reanalyzing data from artifacts discovered decades ago provides a definitive answer.

Scott Fitzpatrick, Professor of Anthropology + Associate Director, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, University of Oregon • conversation
Sept. 29, 2020 ~10 min

archaeology caribbean cuba radiocarbon-dating jamaica islands human-migration trinidad human-settlements artifacts human-settlement

How many people will migrate due to rising sea levels? Our best guesses aren't good enough

Rising sea levels may trap more people than are displaced.

Shouro Dasgupta, Lecturer in Environmental Economics, Università Ca'Foscari • conversation
Sept. 25, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change migration sea-level-rise coastal-erosion coastal-flooding climate-refugees flood-risk

Monarch butterflies' spectacular migration is at risk – an ambitious new plan aims to help save it

Can a plan that brings together government and private landowners create enough habitat for monarch butterflies?

D. André Green II, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan • conversation
Sept. 18, 2020 ~9 min

conservation insects migration wildlife-conservation pollinators trump-administration endangered-species habitat butterflies endangered-species-act

Syrian refugee health workers can help Europe cope with COVID-19

Employing displaced Syrian healthcare workers is a “win-win” for both host communities and refugees as it would strengthen national health services and allow

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Sept. 16, 2020 ~5 min

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