How do pandemics end? History suggests diseases fade but are almost never truly gone

As ready as you are to be done with COVID-19, it's not going anywhere soon. A historian of disease describes how once a pathogen emerges, it's usually here to stay.

Nükhet Varlik, Associate Professor of History, University of South Carolina • conversation
Oct. 14, 2020 ~9 min

Why males may have a worse response to COVID-19

A new study is the first to identify sex differences in inflammation and immune cell activation in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, which causes COVID-19.

Meghan E. Rebuli, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • conversation
Oct. 12, 2020 ~7 min

Which drugs and therapies are proven to work, and which ones don't, for COVID-19?

During the last six months, news reports have mentioned dozens of drugs that may be effective against the new coronavirus. Here we lay out the evidence and reveal which ones are proven to work. Or not.

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
July 1, 2020 ~7 min

A few superspreaders transmit the majority of coronavirus cases

Epidemiological data suggests that 80% of COVID-19 cases can be traced to just 20% of those infected with SARS-CoV-2.

Elizabeth McGraw, Professor of Entomology and Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Pennsylvania State University • conversation
June 5, 2020 ~8 min

What the phase 1 trials of the first COVID-19 vaccine really mean

Results from phase 1 trials of a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine created a burst of optimism. But details the company failed to release suggest it is too early to speculate whether the vaccine is effective.

Sanjay Mishra, Project Coordinator & Staff Scientist, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt University • conversation
May 21, 2020 ~8 min

Coronavirus vaccine: reasons to be optimistic

We don't have vaccines for the Sars, Mers or the common cold. But that doesn't mean scientists won't crack it this time.

Zania Stamataki, Senior Lecturer in Viral Immunology, University of Birmingham • conversation
May 13, 2020 ~7 min

ACE2: the molecule that helps coronavirus invade your cells

A molecule responsible for lowering our blood pressure also helps coronavirus get into our cells and replicate. And it occurs more in men than in women.

David C Gaze, Lecturer in Clinical Biochemistry, University of Westminster • conversation
May 12, 2020 ~7 min

The puzzling questions of the coronavirus: A doctor addresses 6 questions that are stumping physicians

Mysteries surround the coronavirus, but our expert is here to address some of the most perplexing issues.

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
May 6, 2020 ~5 min

The mysterious disappearance of the first SARS virus, and why we need a vaccine for the current one but didn't for the other

COVID-19 and SARS are both deadly – but different. SARS symptoms were quick to appear, making it easier to contain. Because health officials were able to contain it, the virus died off.

Marilyn J. Roossinck, Professor of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology, Pennsylvania State University • conversation
May 5, 2020 ~8 min

Coronavirus may wane this summer, but don't count on any seasonal variation to end the pandemic

Winter is flu season – could it be coronavirus season as well? The research is mixed, but other factors besides temperature and humidity have more to do with the spread of SARS-CoV-2.

Ellen Wright Clayton, Professor of Pediatrics and Law and Health Policy, Vanderbilt University • conversation
April 15, 2020 ~5 min

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