Climate change: what would 4°C of global warming feel like?

Climate models are likely underestimating the true severity of future warming in urban areas.

Robert Wilby, Professor of Hydroclimatic Modelling, Loughborough University • conversation
Jan. 15, 2021 ~8 min

climate-change global-warming temperature temperature-records extreme-heat 15-degrees global-temperature urban-heat

Arctic warming: are record temperatures and fires arriving earlier than scientists predicted?

The high temperatures and wildfires of 2019 were thought to have heralded a freak summer for the Arctic. Then 2020 brought worse.

Christopher J White, Senior Lecturer in Water & Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde • conversation
Sept. 8, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change wildfire siberia arctic-warming temperature-records climate-modelling

Climate change: 40°C summer temperatures could be common in UK by 2100

A new study lays bare the average summer heat people in the UK can expect by century's end.

Lisa Baldini, Lecturer in Environmental Science, Teesside University • conversation
June 30, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change heat temperature-records greenhouse-gas-emissions

Siberia heatwave: why the Arctic is warming so much faster than the rest of the world

Models have predicted for some time that with every degree of global warming, the Arctic will see double or more.

Jonathan Bamber, Professor of Physical Geography, University of Bristol • conversation
June 25, 2020 ~5 min

climate-change permafrost arctic siberia arctic-warming temperature-records sea-ice

Siberia heat wave: why the Arctic is warming so much faster than the rest of the world

Models have predicted for some time that with every degree of global warming, the Arctic will see double or more.

Jonathan Bamber, Professor of Physical Geography, University of Bristol • conversation
June 25, 2020 ~5 min

climate-change permafrost arctic siberia arctic-warming temperature-records sea-ice

Global warming now pushing heat into territory humans cannot tolerate

'Wet-bulb' temperature records show that deadly thresholds for heat and humidity are arriving faster than anticipated.

Colin Raymond, Postdoctoral Researcher, California Institute of Technology • conversation
May 20, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change climate humidity temperature-records body-temperature extreme-heat heat-deaths

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