Women in STEM: Dr Stephanie Höhn

Dr Stephanie Höhn is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, and a member of Trinity Hall. Here, she tells us about her unusual path to an academic career, the advantages of being a biologist in a mathematics department, and how an organism that can turn itself inside out might one day help us prevent certain birth defects.

Cambridge University News | Nov. 14, 2019 | cambridge
~6 mins   

Tags: women-in-stem mathematics physics cell

‘Messy’ production of perovskite material increases solar cell efficiency

Discovery means simpler and cheaper manufacturing methods are actually beneficial for the material’s use in next-generation solar cells or LED lighting.

Cambridge University News | Nov. 11, 2019 | cambridge
~6 mins   

Tags: physics solar-cells perovskite energy advanced-materials

Women in STEM: Vidhi Lalchand

Vidhi is a PhD candidate at the Cavendish Laboratory, a Turing Scholar, and a member of Christ’s College. Here, she tells us about growing up in Madras, her research in machine learning and leaving the world of finance for academia.

Cambridge University News | Nov. 7, 2019 | cambridge
~6 mins   

Tags: machine-learning artificial-intelligence physics women-in-stem

Cambridge joins new transatlantic research alliance to detect cancer at its earliest stage

Cambridge scientists are set to benefit from a major cash injection from Cancer Research UK and partners to develop radical new strategies and technologies to detect cancer at its earliest stage.

Cambridge University News | Oct. 21, 2019 | cambridge
~8 mins   

Tags: cancer future-therapeutics physics

Quantum state of single electrons controlled by ‘surfing’ on sound waves

Researchers have successfully used sound waves to control quantum information in a single electron, a significant step towards efficient, robust quantum computers made from semiconductors.

Cambridge University News | Oct. 10, 2019 | cambridge
~4 mins   

Tags: physics quantum quantum-computing

Women in STEM: Amelia Drew

Amelia Drew is a PhD candidate in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics. Here, she tells us about dark matter, being the only scientist in the family, and how to avoid feeling isolated during a PhD. 

Cambridge University News | Oct. 10, 2019 | cambridge
~3 mins   

Tags: women-in-stem mathematics cosmology physics

Professor Didier Queloz wins 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics for first discovery of an exoplanet

Queloz jointly wins the 2019 Physics Nobel for his work on the first confirmation of an exoplanet – a planet that orbits a star other than our Sun. 

Cambridge University News | Oct. 8, 2019 | cambridge
~8 mins   

Tags: astronomy astrophysics exoplanets nobel-prize

Professor Didier Queloz wins 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of an exoplanet

Queloz jointly wins the 2019 Physics Nobel for his work on the first confirmation of an exoplanet – a planet that orbits a star other than our Sun. 

Cambridge University News | Oct. 8, 2019 | cambridge
~4 mins   

Tags: astronomy astrophysics exoplanets

Women in STEM: Dr Cohl Furey

Dr Cohl Furey is a Walter Grant Scott Fellow in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, and a member of Trinity Hall. Here, she tells us about the elegance of mathematical physics, which 'gets better and better the further you go.'  

Cambridge University News | Sept. 12, 2019 | cambridge
~2 mins   

Tags: mathematics physics women-in-stem

AI learns the language of chemistry to predict how to make medicines

Researchers have designed a machine learning algorithm that predicts the outcome of chemical reactions with much higher accuracy than trained chemists and suggests ways to make complex molecules, removing a significant hurdle in drug discovery.

Cambridge University News | Sept. 3, 2019 | cambridge
~5 mins   

Tags: physics drug-discovery pharmaceutical artificial-intelligence advanced-materials chemistry

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