‘Quantum negativity’ can power ultra-precise measurements

Scientists have found that a physical property called ‘quantum negativity’ can be used to take more precise measurements of everything from molecular distances

Cambridge University News • cambridge
July 29, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: quantum physics

‘Lost’ world’s rediscovery is step towards finding habitable planets

The rediscovery of a lost planet could pave the way for the detection of a world within the habitable ‘Goldilocks zone’ in a distant solar system.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
July 21, 2020 ~4 min

Tags: physics astrophysics astronomy exoplanets

Flashes bright when squeezed tight: how single-celled organisms light up the oceans

Research explains how a unicellular marine organism generates light as a response to mechanical stimulation, lighting up breaking waves at night.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
July 6, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: physics light

Shedding light on dark traps

Researchers pinpoint the origin of defects that sap the performance of next-generation solar technology.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
April 16, 2020 ~18 min

Tags: advanced-materials physics perovskite solar-cells energy

Cambridge researchers awarded European Research Council funding

Four researchers at the University of Cambridge have won advanced grants from the European Research Council (ERC), Europe’s premier research funding body.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
April 1, 2020 ~4 min

Tags:  advanced-materials  quantum  physics  materials  optics  archaeology

Identification of viruses and bacteria could be sped up through computational methods

A new multinational study has shown how the process of distinguishing viruses and bacteria could be accelerated through the use of computational methods.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
March 30, 2020 ~4 min

Tags:  dna  physics  genome  bacteria

Watching magnetic nano ‘tornadoes’ in 3D

Scientists have developed a three-dimensional imaging technique to observe complex behaviours in magnets, including fast-moving waves and ‘tornadoes’ thousands of times thinner than a human hair.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Feb. 24, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: advanced-materials physics nanotechnology magnetic-field

Women in STEM: Dr Francesca Chadha-Day

Dr Fran Day is a theoretical physicist, a research fellow at Peterhouse, and a science comedian. Here, she tells us about her lifelong love of physics, her work on dark matter and particles called axions, and the high that comes with making a roomful of people laugh. 

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Feb. 6, 2020 ~7 min

Tags:  physics  women-in-stem  astronomy  dark-matter

Sand dunes can ‘communicate’ with each other

Even though they are inanimate objects, sand dunes can ‘communicate’ with each other, researchers have found. A team from the University of Cambridge has found that as they move, sand dunes interact with and repel their downstream neighbours.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Feb. 4, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: physics sand desert flow

Women in STEM: Angela Harper

Angela Harper is a PhD candidate at the Cavendish Laboratory, a member of Churchill College, and a Gates Cambridge Scholar. Here, she tells us about her work in renewable energy, setting up a Girls in STEM programme while she was an undergraduate in North Carolina, and the importance of role models when pursuing a career in STEM. 

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Jan. 2, 2020 ~4 min

Tags:  physics  women-in-stem  sustainable-earth  energy  renewable  battery

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