Coronavirus variants, viral mutation and COVID-19 vaccines: The science you need to understand

The virus is evolving and new strains are more transmissible. Will the vaccines work against these new variants? How can researchers stay ahead of the virus's evolution?

Richard Kuhn, Professor of Biological Sciences, Purdue University • conversation
Feb. 2, 2021 ~9 min

Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine is cheaper than Pfizer's and Moderna's and doesn't require supercold temperature

There is now a third vaccine that prevents COVID-19 infections. It isn't quite as effective as the other two vaccines but it has advantages that may make it the frontrunner.

Sanjay Mishra, Project Coordinator & Staff Scientist, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt University • conversation
Nov. 24, 2020 ~9 min

What monoclonal antibodies are – and why we need them as well as a vaccine

Monoclonal antibodies are synthetic molecules manufactured in the lab. But do we need them if a vaccine is on its way?

Rodney E. Rohde, Professor Clinical Laboratory Science, Texas State University • conversation
Nov. 16, 2020 ~9 min

An autoimmune-like antibody response is linked with severe COVID-19

Patients suffering from severe COVID-19 may be experiencing a rogue antibody response similar to that seen in autoimmune diseases. The findings offer new approaches for COVID-19 therapy.

Matthew Woodruff, Instructor, Lowance Center for Human Immunology, Emory University • conversation
Oct. 8, 2020 ~8 min

One small part of a human antibody has the potential to work as a drug for both prevention and therapy of COVID-19

Antibodies are great for neutralizing viruses. But they are big and bulky. Antibody engineers are now creating smaller synthetic antibody-like molecules that may be better for fighting COVID-19.

Dimiter Stanchev Dimitrov, Professor of Medicine and Director, Center for Antibody Therapeutics, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
Oct. 1, 2020 ~9 min

Declining antibodies and immunity to COVID-19 – why the worry?

If antibody levels drop dramatically after an infection, what does that mean for immunity? An expert explains how B and T cells contribute to immunity and why antibodies don't tell the full story.

Alexander (Sasha) Poltorak, Professor of Immunology, Tufts University • conversation
Aug. 26, 2020 ~7 min

Am I immune to COVID-19 if I have antibodies?

If you have had COVID-19 already, are you protected from another bout of the illness? And is the presence of antibodies in your blood a guarantee of immunity?

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
June 12, 2020 ~6 min

A mysterious illness is striking children amid the coronavirus pandemic – but is it Kawasaki disease?

A biomedical researcher and pediatrician who works with Kawasaki disease and COVID-19 explains the similarities and differences in the worrisome cases doctors are starting to see.

Mark Hicar, Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York • conversation
May 6, 2020 ~7 min

A mysterious illness is striking children amid the coronavirus pandemic – but don't be too quick to tie it to Kawasaki disease

A biomedical researcher and pediatrician who works with Kawasaki disease and COVID-19 explains the similarities and differences in the worrisome cases doctors are starting to see.

Mark Hicar, Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York • conversation
May 6, 2020 ~7 min

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