Tiny treetop flowers foster incredible beetle biodiversity

In the Amazon, beetles and flowering trees have developed a tight bond. Hundreds of beetle species thrive off of and pollinate blossoms, helping to maintain some of the highest biodiversity on Earth.

Caroline S. Chaboo, Adjunct Professor in Insect Systematics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln • conversation
Dec. 3, 2020 ~6 min

conservation biodiversity amazon ecology beetles trees rainforest pollinators venezuela flowers tropical-rainforest

Flooding can help resurrect wetlands and slow climate change – here's how

Flooding isn't always destructive – it can be part of our toolkit for restoring ecosystems.

George Heritage, Honorary Research Fellow in Hydromorphology, University of Salford • conversation
Nov. 25, 2020 ~7 min

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Three ways to head off the next pandemic in the wild meat trade

Needed: less wild meat in cities, more wildlife experts in public health.

Julia E. Fa, Professor of Biodiversity and Human Development, Manchester Metropolitan University • conversation
Oct. 29, 2020 ~6 min

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Want to teach kids about nature? Insects can help

Insects are plentiful and inexpensive. Even when children aren't attending school in person, they can learn from the encounters they have with insects outside.

Megan Ennes, Assistant Curator of Museum Education, University of Florida • conversation
Oct. 29, 2020 ~5 min

innovation biodiversity insects bees science-education citizen-science quick-reads k-12-education invertebrates moths butterflies spiders stem-education arthropods outdoor-education environmental-education pandemic-education

Invasive species: why Britain can't eat its way out of its crayfish problem

We found that signal crayfish traps tend to catch larger males, letting the bulk of the population go free.

Eleri G. Pritchard, PhD Candidate in Freshwater Ecology, UCL • conversation
Oct. 13, 2020 ~6 min

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Four reasons why restoring nature is the most important endeavour of our time

We must turn pledges into immediate action and restore our ecosystems on a global level.

Jake M. Robinson, Ecologist and PhD Researcher, Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield • conversation
Oct. 6, 2020 ~8 min

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Biodiversity: where the world is making progress – and where it's not

The world missed all 20 targets for stemming the tide of biodiversity loss. But there has been some progress over the last decade.

Tom Oliver, Professor of Applied Ecology, University of Reading • conversation
Sept. 30, 2020 ~8 min

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How to reverse global wildlife declines by 2050

Wildlife populations have plummeted by 68% since 1970. But we have a plan to turn things around.

Piero Visconti, Research Scholar, Ecosystem Services and Management Programme, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) • conversation
Sept. 14, 2020 ~6 min

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Protecting half of the planet is the best way to fight climate change and biodiversity loss – we've mapped the key places to do it

A new plan targets areas around the world that can store carbon and protect large numbers of species. It calls for preserving these lands, working with Indigenous peoples and connecting wild areas.

Greg Asner, Director, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science and Professor, Arizona State University • conversation
Sept. 8, 2020 ~9 min

 climate-change  conservation  biodiversity  indigenous-peoples  endangered-species  ecosystems  wildlife-corridors  earth-observation  sixth-mass-extinction  paris-climate-accord  monitoring  connectivity

Why grandparents should talk to children about the natural world of their youth

Shifting baseline syndrome affects everyone. It's blinding us to the long-term deterioration of wildlife and ecosystems.

Lizzie Jones, PhD Candidate in Zoology, Royal Holloway • conversation
Sept. 1, 2020 ~5 min

biodiversity wildlife oral-history generations grandparents baseline-assessments

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