Tiny plankton drive processes in the ocean that capture twice as much carbon as scientists thought

Microscopic ocean phytoplankton feed a "biological pump" that carries carbon from the surface to deep waters. Scientists have found that this process stores much more carbon than previously thought.

Ken Buesseler, Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution • conversation
May 21, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: climate-change oceans photosynthesis phytoplankton carbon-storage carbon-sequestration marine-biology marine-snow marine-biodiversity

COVID-19 is eroding scientific field work – and our knowledge of how the world is changing

The COVID-19 pandemic is interrupting scientific field work across North America, leaving blank spots in important data sets and making it harder to track ecological change.

Casey Setash, PhD student in Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University • conversation
May 19, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: climate-change biology wildlife colorado ecology nature ducks phenology massachusetts thoreau migratory-birds field-research coronavirus-2020 covid-19

What's the point of grief?

A bereavement counsellor on grief, loss and longing.

John Frederick Wilson, Honorary Research Fellow, Director of Bereavement Services Counselling & Mental Health Clinic, York St John University • conversation
May 13, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: evolution depression grief grieving evolutionary-biology trauma bereavement five-stages-of-grief

Your genes could determine whether the coronavirus puts you in the hospital – and we're starting to unravel which ones matter

Researchers from Oregon Health and Science University found that variations in genes that code for parts of the cellular alarm system might play a role in how well people fight off COVID-19.

Reid Thompson, Assistant Professor of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University • conversation
May 5, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: genetics biology disease immune-system cells genes coronavirus immune-cells viruses computational-biology white-blood-cells immune t-cells covid-19 research-brief

Scientists at work: Uncovering the mystery of when and where sharks give birth

Researchers are using a newly developed satellite tag to study previously unknown aspects of tiger shark reproduction. This approach could be used on other difficult-to-study shark species.

Hannah Verkamp, PhD Student in Marine Biology, Arizona State University • conversation
April 28, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: conservation reproduction oceans wildlife sharks endangered-species marine-biology scientists-at-work tagging tiger-sharks women-scientists satellite-data the-bahamas

Play fighting helps equip animals for later life – new research

Female piglets with more play fighting experience did better in adult contests – but for males the opposite was true.

Gareth Arnott, Lecturer in Animal Behaviour and Welfare, Queen's University Belfast • conversation
April 28, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: evolutionary-biology pigs wild-boar

Insects: worldwide study reveals widespread decline since 1925

The largest study of insect declines to date gives us the best indication of how species all over the world are faring.

Stuart Reynolds, Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Bath • conversation
April 23, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: conservation biodiversity insects entomology bugs freshwater-biology insect-decline

Insects: worldwide study reveals general decline since 1925

The largest study of insect declines to date gives us the best indication of how species all over the world are faring.

Stuart Reynolds, Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Bath • conversation
April 23, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: conservation biodiversity insects entomology bugs freshwater-biology insect-decline

How did insects get their colours? Crystal-covered beetle discovery sheds light

Researchers realised a dull-looking 13,000-year-old weevil was actually covered in brilliant green, blue and yellow nanoscopic crystals.

Luke McDonald, Postdoctoral Researcher, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork • conversation
April 16, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: palaeontology beetles nanophotonics colours palaeobiology

Scientists have found oil from the Deepwater Horizon blowout in fishes' livers and on the deep ocean floor

The Deepwater Horizon oil disaster catalyzed a decade of research on oil contamination in the Gulf of Mexico, from surface waters to the seabed, with surprising findings.

Sherryl Gilbert, Assistant Director, C-IMAGE Consortium, University of South Florida • conversation
April 13, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: fisheries water-pollution deepwater-horizon marine-biology bp-oil-spill marine-science marine-snow gulf-of-mexico hydrocarbons

Page 1 of 2