A tiny circular racetrack for light can rapidly detect single molecules

An optical sensor that can detect individual molecules promises early detection of diseases and environmental contamination.

Judith Su, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Optical Sciences, University of Arizona • conversation
yesterday ~5 min

Tags: engineering chemistry covid-19 photonics sars-cov-2 quick-reads research-brief sensors biochemistry biomedical-research biomedical-engineering biosensors biological-sensor

Designing batteries for easier recycling could avert a looming e-waste crisis

Batteries power much of modern life, from electric and hybrid cars to computers, medical devices and cellphones. But unless they're made easier and cheaper to recycle, a battery waste crisis looms.

Darren H. S. Tan, PhD Candidate in Chemical Engineering, University of California San Diego • conversation
yesterday ~10 min

Tags: chemistry electronics recycling materials-science electric-vehicles renewable-energy toxic-waste batteries energy-storage municipal-solid-waste e-waste green-design lithium-batteries

Nobel prize: two women share chemistry prize for the first time for work on 'genetic scissors'

Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna share the Nobel prize for chemistry for their CRISPR/Cas9 tool to rewrite the blueprint of life.

Kalpana Surendranath, Senior Lecturer in Molecular biology and Microbiology, Leader of Genome Engineering Lab, University of Westminster • conversation
Oct. 7, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: chemistry genome-editing nobel-prize-2020

Nobel Prize: two women scientists share chemistry prize for the first time for work on 'genetic scissors'

Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna share the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their CRISPR/Cas9 tool to rewrite the blueprint of life.

Kalpana Surendranath, Senior Lecturer in Molecular biology and Microbiology, Leader of Genome Engineering Lab, University of Westminster • conversation
Oct. 7, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: chemistry genome-editing nobel-prize-2020

How a new solar and lighting technology could propel a renewable energy transformation

Halide perovskites are cheap, versatile and remarkably efficient as both solar cells and light emitters.

Sam Stranks, Lecturer in Energy and Royal Society University Research Fellow, University of Cambridge • conversation
Sept. 1, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: chemistry energy solar-power interdisciplinarity climate-crisis solar-panels leds

How new solar and lighting technology could propel a renewable energy transformation

Halide perovskites are cheap, versatile and remarkably efficient as both solar cells and light emitters.

Sam Stranks, Lecturer in Energy and Royal Society University Research Fellow, University of Cambridge • conversation
Sept. 1, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: chemistry energy solar-power interdisciplinarity climate-crisis solar-panels leds

Clever chemistry turns ordinary bricks into electricity storage devices

Bricks turn out to be useful for storing electricity thanks to their porousness and red pigment.

Julio M. D'Arcy, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Washington University in St Louis • conversation
Aug. 11, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: chemistry innovation energy nanotechnology electricity research-brief buildings energy-storage

The road to electric vehicles with lower sticker prices than gas cars – battery costs explained

EVs will have lower sticker prices than gas vehicles when batteries are cheaper. Getting there comes down to knowing where to cut costs.

Shashank Sripad, Ph.D. Candidate in Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University • conversation
July 27, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: chemistry electric-vehicles technology batteries cobalt lithium-ion nickel evs

What is methamphetamine or 'crystal meth'?

A history of the drug crystal meth.

Simon Cotton, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry, University of Birmingham • conversation
June 24, 2020 ~7 min

Tags:  chemistry  methamphetamines  crystal-meth

What is tear gas?

The chemical weapon, tear gas, was used in Washington DC, Los Angeles, Orlando and several other cities to control crowds protesting the death of George Floyd. But what is it? Does it cause harm?

Janice Chambers, Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine; Director, Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Mississippi State University • conversation
June 4, 2020 ~4 min

Tags:  chemistry  george-floyd  crowd-control  chemical-weapons-convention

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