How deforestation helps deadly viruses jump from animals to humans

Yellow fever, malaria and Ebola all spilled over from animals to humans at the edges of tropical forests. The new coronavirus is the latest zoonosis.

Maria Anice Mureb Sallum, Professor of Epidemiology, Universidade de São Paulo • conversation
June 25, 2020 ~11 min

Tags: health climate covid-19 coronavirus ebola pandemic malaria forests disease epidemics wildlife deforestation bats wildlife-trade monkeys mosquitoes yellow-fever zoonoses vectors carrying-capacity

Why we need the human touch in contact tracing for coronavirus

Humans can identify asymptomatic cases, build trust and assauge fears. Apps cannot.

Roderick Bailey, Research Fellow, Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities, University of Oxford • conversation
May 19, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus ebola covid-19-containment contact-tracing medical-history

I was a nurse on the front lines of Ebola, and I saw that nurses need support for the trauma and pain they experience

Nurses on the front lines of a pandemic need education, training and institutional support.

Cheedy Jaja, Professor of Nursing, University of South Carolina • conversation
April 29, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: infectious-diseases covid-19 coronavirus ebola stress burnout covid-19-front-lines nurses west-africa ebola-outbreak

Coronavirus: three misconceptions about how animals transmit diseases debunked

Zoonotic diseases can emerge closer to home than you realise.

Olivier Restif, Alborada Lecturer in Epidemiology, University of Cambridge • conversation
April 16, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus ebola wildlife pathogens zoonotic-diseases bush-meat zoonotic-viruses bird-flu wet-markets

Coronavirus: three misconceptions about how wildlife transmit diseases debunked

Zoonotic diseases can emerge closer to home than you realise.

Olivier Restif, Alborada Lecturer in Epidemiology, University of Cambridge • conversation
April 16, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus ebola wildlife pathogens zoonotic-diseases bush-meat zoonotic-viruses bird-flu wet-markets

Overloaded morgues, mass graves and infectious remains: How forensic pathologists handle the coronavirus dead

An expert on forensic science explains the critical role of coroners and pathologists in the COVID-19 crisis, as many cities struggle to manage the soaring number of dead bodies.

Ahmad Samarji, Associate Professor of Forensic Science Education & STEM Education and the Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Phoenicia University • conversation
April 8, 2020 ~10 min

Tags:  infectious-diseases  covid-19  coronavirus  ebola  death  pandemic  forensic-science  covid-19-front-lines  coroner  q-and-a  autopsy  human-remains

Antibodies in the blood of COVID-19 survivors know how to beat coronavirus – and researchers are already testing new treatments that harness them

Before a vaccine is available to teach your immune system to ward off the coronavirus, maybe you can directly use molecules that have already fought it in other people.

Ann Sheehy, Professor of Biology, College of the Holy Cross • conversation
April 1, 2020 ~9 min

Tags:  covid-19  coronavirus  immune-system  ebola  antibodies  sars-cov-2  viruses  blood  ebola-virus  plasma

Calling COVID-19 a 'Chinese virus' is wrong and dangerous – the pandemic is global

Emphasizing foreign origins of a disease can have racist connotations and implications for how people understand their own risk of disease.

Mari Webel, Assistant Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
March 25, 2020 ~10 min

Tags:  history-of-medicine  infectious-diseases  covid-19  coronavirus  history  ebola  pandemic  rift-valley-fever  wuhan  world-health-organization  sars-cov-2  2019-ncov  epidemics  new-coronavirus  world-health-organization-who  norovirus  wuhan-coronavirus  lassa-fever  cholera  bush-meat  ebola-virus  ebola-virus-disease  rift-valley-fever-virus  ebola-zaire  ebola-blame  covid-19-pandemic

Naming the new coronavirus – why taking Wuhan out of the picture matters

While identifying a new disease by its place of origin seems intuitive, history shows that doing so can have serious consequences for the people that live there.

Mari Webel, Assistant Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
Feb. 18, 2020 ~9 min

Tags:  history-of-medicine  infectious-diseases  covid-19  coronavirus  history  ebola  rift-valley-fever  wuhan  world-health-organization  2019-ncov  epidemics  new-coronavirus  wuhan-coronavirus  lassa-fever  cholera  ebola-virus  ebola-virus-disease  rift-valley-fever-virus

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