In a time of social and environmental crisis, Aldo Leopold's call for a 'land ethic' is still relevant

Jan. 11 marks the birthday of conservationist Aldo Leopold (1887-1948), who called for thinking about land as a living community to protect, not a resource to exploit.

Curt D. Meine, Adjunct Associate Professor of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison • conversation
Jan. 5, 2021 ~9 min

conservation ethics ecology environmental-justice racism us-history land restoration-ecology environmental-movement wilderness

Goldenrod honey: misinformation is causing a biological invasion of this Canadian weed

Our study is the first to research the impact of online misinformation on biological invasions.

Johannes M H Knops, Professor & Head of Department Health and Environmental Sciences, Xi'an Jiaotong Liverpool University • conversation
Dec. 23, 2020 ~8 min

bees internet ecology misinformation interdisciplinarity honey invasive-species weeds

How curators transferred Sequoia and King's Canyon National Parks' archives to escape wildfires

The curator at UC Merced describes the evacuation and shows a selection of photographs from the 110-year history of the park.

Emily Lin, Head of Digital Curation and Scholarship, UC Merced, University of California, Merced • conversation
Dec. 23, 2020 ~7 min

conservation ecology land-management california wildfires national-parks archives

Tiny treetop flowers foster incredible beetle biodiversity

In the Amazon, beetles and flowering trees have developed a tight bond. Hundreds of beetle species thrive off of and pollinate blossoms, helping to maintain some of the highest biodiversity on Earth.

Caroline S. Chaboo, Adjunct Professor in Insect Systematics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln • conversation
Dec. 3, 2020 ~6 min

conservation biodiversity amazon ecology beetles trees rainforest pollinators venezuela flowers tropical-rainforest

Fences have big effects on land and wildlife around the world that are rarely measured

Millions of miles of fences crisscross the Earth's surface. They divide ecosystems and affect wild species in ways that often are harmful, but are virtually unstudied.

Wenjing Xu, PhD Candidate in Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Nov. 30, 2020 ~10 min

africa ecology australia infrastructure wildlife livestock us-mexico-border-wall ecosystems roads habitat-fragmentation invasive-species predators us-west fences animal-migration

One-fifth of ecosystems in danger of collapse – here’s what that might look like

Humans have caused ecosystems to collapse on purpose for millennia, to grow food or build settlements. But unplanned collapses are a different matter.

John Dearing, Professor of Physical Geography, University of Southampton • conversation
Nov. 24, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change agriculture ecology rainforest coral-reefs ecosystems ecological-crisis ecosystem-collapse

A skin-eating fungus from Europe could decimate Appalachia's salamanders – but researchers are working to prevent an outbreak

The Bsal fungus is not yet here in North America, or any place in the Western Hemisphere, but there is concern that the pet trade is the most likely route for introduction here.

Matt Gray, Professor, University of Tennessee • conversation
Nov. 6, 2020 ~8 min

ecology fungus amphibians chytrid-fungus appalachia

Scientists at work: Sloshing through marshes to see how birds survive hurricanes

Birds found along the Gulf Coast have evolved to ride out hurricanes and tropical storms. But with development degrading the marshes where they live, it's getting harder for them to bounce back.

Mark Woodrey, Assistant Research Professor, Mississippi State University • conversation
Oct. 28, 2020 ~9 min

climate-change birds ecology mississippi sea-level-rise hurricanes scientists-at-work tropical-storms coastal-development marshes wetlands gulf-coast alabama

Restoring seagrasses can bring coastal bays back to life

Healthy seagrasses form underwater meadows teeming with fish and shellfish. A successful large-scale restoration project in Virginia could become a model for reseeding damaged seagrass beds worldwide.

Karen McGlathery, Professor of Environmental Sciences and Director, Environmental Resilience Institute, University of Virginia • conversation
Oct. 20, 2020 ~11 min

climate-change ecology fisheries water-pollution coasts ecosystem-services coastal-development oceans atlantic-ocean virginia seagrass ecological-restoration seagrass-meadows

Evolution on the smallest of scales smooths out the patchwork patterns of where plants and animals live

Local adaptation allows plants and animals to thrive in a diversity of places. Sometimes adaptation sharpens patterns of where organisms live, but 85% of the time, it creates a more homogeneous world.

Mark C. Urban, Director, Center of Biological Risk; Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut • conversation
Oct. 2, 2020 ~10 min

evolution environment ecology trees forests charles-darwin adaptation

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