Live fast, die small: how global heating is simplifying the world's ecosystems

We studied a rocky shore to see how global changes are playing out within habitats.

Miguel Lurgi, Lecturer in Biosciences, Swansea University • conversation
yesterday ~6 min

Tags: climate-change ecology global-warming predator-prey-interaction ecosystems species global-heating

When hurricanes temporarily halt fishing, marine food webs recover quickly

Hurricane Harvey destroyed the fishing infrastructure of Aransas Bay and reduced fishing by 80% over the following year. This removed humans from the trophic cascade and whole food webs changed.

Joseph W. Reustle, SPIRE Postdoctoral Scholar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • conversation
Sept. 15, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: environment fish ecology hurricane fishing food-webs research-brief marine-biology ecosystems texas cyclones gulf-coast trophic-cascade oyster-reefs

How to reverse global wildlife declines by 2050

Wildlife populations have plummeted by 68% since 1970. But we have a plan to turn things around.

Piero Visconti, Research Scholar, Ecosystem Services and Management Programme, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) • conversation
Sept. 14, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: conservation biodiversity agriculture wildlife ecosystem-services ecosystems biodiversity-loss sixth-mass-extinction food-systems

Protecting half of the planet is the best way to fight climate change and biodiversity loss – we've mapped the key places to do it

A new plan targets areas around the world that can store carbon and protect large numbers of species. It calls for preserving these lands, working with Indigenous peoples and connecting wild areas.

Greg Asner, Director, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science and Professor, Arizona State University • conversation
Sept. 8, 2020 ~9 min

Tags:  climate-change  conservation  biodiversity  indigenous-peoples  endangered-species  ecosystems  wildlife-corridors  earth-observation  sixth-mass-extinction  paris-climate-accord  monitoring  connectivity

Parasitic worms in your shellfish lead a creepy but popular lifestyle

Mud blister worms make their homes in the shells of oysters and other shellfish, where they weaken their hosts.

Andrew David, Assistant Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
June 3, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: biology shellfish worms calcium-carbonate aquaculture food-webs ecosystems invasive-species parasites zoology scallops abalone larvae

Huge ecosystems could collapse in less than 50 years – new study

Our findings have worrying implications for the functioning of our planet.

Simon Willcock, Senior Lecturer in Environmental Geography, Bangor University • conversation
March 10, 2020 ~7 min

Tags:  climate-change  ecology  tipping-points  ecosystems

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