Invasive tawny crazy ants have an intense craving for calcium – with implications for their spread in the US

The spread of tawny crazy ants may be driven, in part, by their need for calcium.

Ryan Reihart, Teaching Assistant and Ph.D. Candidate of Ecology, University of Dayton • conversation
Jan. 21, 2021 ~5 min

Fences have big effects on land and wildlife around the world that are rarely measured

Millions of miles of fences crisscross the Earth's surface. They divide ecosystems and affect wild species in ways that often are harmful, but are virtually unstudied.

Wenjing Xu, PhD Candidate in Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Nov. 30, 2020 ~10 min

One-fifth of ecosystems in danger of collapse – here’s what that might look like

Humans have caused ecosystems to collapse on purpose for millennia, to grow food or build settlements. But unplanned collapses are a different matter.

John Dearing, Professor of Physical Geography, University of Southampton • conversation
Nov. 24, 2020 ~7 min

How medieval Christian ideology changed the Polish environment forever – new study

Historians and scientists discovered how colonisation in eastern Europe changed ecosystems – and the societies embedded in them.

Amanda Power, Associate Professor of Medieval History, University of Oxford • conversation
Nov. 20, 2020 ~7 min

Four reasons why restoring nature is the most important endeavour of our time

We must turn pledges into immediate action and restore our ecosystems on a global level.

Jake M. Robinson, Ecologist and PhD Researcher, Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield • conversation
Oct. 6, 2020 ~8 min

Live fast, die small: how global heating is simplifying the world's ecosystems

We studied a rocky shore to see how global changes are playing out within habitats.

Miguel Lurgi, Lecturer in Biosciences, Swansea University • conversation
Sept. 24, 2020 ~6 min

When hurricanes temporarily halt fishing, marine food webs recover quickly

Hurricane Harvey destroyed the fishing infrastructure of Aransas Bay and reduced fishing by 80% over the following year. This removed humans from the trophic cascade and whole food webs changed.

Joseph W. Reustle, SPIRE Postdoctoral Scholar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • conversation
Sept. 15, 2020 ~6 min

How to reverse global wildlife declines by 2050

Wildlife populations have plummeted by 68% since 1970. But we have a plan to turn things around.

Piero Visconti, Research Scholar, Ecosystem Services and Management Programme, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) • conversation
Sept. 14, 2020 ~6 min

Protecting half of the planet is the best way to fight climate change and biodiversity loss – we've mapped the key places to do it

A new plan targets areas around the world that can store carbon and protect large numbers of species. It calls for preserving these lands, working with Indigenous peoples and connecting wild areas.

Greg Asner, Director, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science and Professor, Arizona State University • conversation
Sept. 8, 2020 ~9 min

Parasitic worms in your shellfish lead a creepy but popular lifestyle

Mud blister worms make their homes in the shells of oysters and other shellfish, where they weaken their hosts.

Andrew David, Assistant Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
June 3, 2020 ~7 min

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