Only two northern white rhinos remain, and they're both female – here's how we could make more

By unlocking the full potential of rhino ovaries, we hope to produce enough eggs to revive the northern white rhino in the wild.

Suzannah Williams, Associate Professor in Ovarian Physiology, Lead for Ovarian Cryopreservation and Fertility Preservation Research, Lead of Rhino Fertility Project, University of Oxford • conversation
Oct. 15, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: africa conservation extinction endangered-species ivf rhino northern-white-rhino white-rhino resurrection-ecology assisted-reproductive-technology

Biodiversity: where the world is making progress – and where it's not

The world missed all 20 targets for stemming the tide of biodiversity loss. But there has been some progress over the last decade.

Tom Oliver, Professor of Applied Ecology, University of Reading • conversation
Sept. 30, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: climate-change biodiversity extinction united-nations wildlife invasive-species habitat-loss species-loss unep convention-on-biodiversity

'Extinction: The Facts': Attenborough's new documentary is surprisingly radical

A conservation scientist interviewed on the programme says Sir David tells it like it is.

Julia P G Jones, Professor of Conservation Science, Bangor University • conversation
Sept. 14, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change extinction wildlife-conservation david-attenborough habitat-loss

Insect apocalypse? Not so fast, at least in North America

Recent reports of dramatic declines in insect populations have sparked concern about an 'insect apocalypse.' But a new analysis of data from sites across North America suggests the case isn't proven.

Matthew D. Moran, Professor of Biology, Hendrix College • conversation
Aug. 10, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: biodiversity insects science extinction ecology research biodiversity-loss publication-bias scholarship

Why some species thrive after catastrophe – rules for making the most of an apocalypse

When the dinosaurs went extinct, some species took over the world. Adaptability, not survivability, explains why.

Nick Longrich, Senior Lecturer in Evolutionary Biology and Paleontology, University of Bath • conversation
July 20, 2020 ~9 min

Tags:  evolution  dinosaurs  extinction  palaeontology  mass-extinction  dinosaur-extinction  bird-evolution  ancient-mammals

More people eat frog legs than you think – and humans are harvesting frogs at unsustainable rates

Frogs are harvested as food by the millions every year. A new study shows that uncontrolled frog hunting could drive some populations to extinction by midcentury.

Kerim Çiçek, Associate Professor of Zoology, Ege University • conversation
June 12, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: food extinction frogs regulation endangered-species amphibians hunting turkey

Will humans go extinct? For all the existential threats, we'll likely be here for a very long time

Large numbers, huge ranges, and adaptibility make the human species very difficult to eradicate

Nick Longrich, Senior Lecturer in Evolutionary Biology and Paleontology, University of Bath • conversation
May 5, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: extinction apocalypse mass-extinction

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