Ancient DNA is revealing the genetic landscape of people who first settled East Asia

By studying the DNA of people who lived in East Asia thousands of years ago, scientists are starting to untangle how the region was populated.

Melinda A. Yang, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Richmond • conversation
Sept. 15, 2020 ~11 min

Tags: ancient-dna hunter-gatherers china agriculture archaeology genes genomics southeast-asia rice adna siberia paleoanthropology human-migration east-asia hunter-gatherer start-of-agriculture paleogenomics

A doctor's open apology to those fighting overweight and obesity

All too often the medical community 'fat-shames' patients trying to lose weight, when in fact obesity and overweight are complicated medical issues.

J. David Prologo, Associate Professor, Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University • conversation
Sept. 8, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: diet genes prejudice eating obese overweight dieting losing-weight overeating obesity-series-2018

Brain scientists haven't been able to find major differences between women's and men's brains, despite over a century of searching

Attempts to find brain structures responsible for supposed cognitive sex differences have not succeeded.

Ari Berkowitz, Presidential Professor of Biology; Director, Cellular & Behavioral Neurobiology Graduate Program, University of Oklahoma • conversation
Aug. 6, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: genetics brain genes learning intelligence hippocampus human-brain john-stuart-mill sex-differences brain-regions brain-size

From marmots to mole-rats to marmosets – studying many genes in many animals is key to understanding how humans can live longer

Is there a single master gene that controls longevity in all mammals? Or are 'Fountain of Youth' genes little more than a myth?

Amanda Kowalczyk, Ph.D. Candidate in Computational and Systems Biology, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
July 1, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  genes  aging  longevity  living-longer-2020  living-longer  youth  lifespan  fountain-of-youth

Your genes could determine whether the coronavirus puts you in the hospital – and we're starting to unravel which ones matter

Researchers from Oregon Health and Science University found that variations in genes that code for parts of the cellular alarm system might play a role in how well people fight off COVID-19.

Reid Thompson, Assistant Professor of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University • conversation
May 5, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: genetics covid-19 coronavirus immune-system biology genes t-cells immune-cells disease viruses research-brief white-blood-cells immune cells computational-biology

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