What makes hurricanes stall, and why is that so hard to forecast?

Hurricane stalling has become common over the past half-century, and their average forward speed has also slowed.

Kimberly Wood, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Mississippi State University • conversation
Sept. 24, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change atmosphere flooding hurricanes meteorology weather tropical-cyclones

What makes hurricanes stall, and why is it so hard to forecast?

Hurricane stalling has become common over the past half-century, and their average forward speed has also slowed.

Kimberly Wood, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Mississippi State University • conversation
Sept. 24, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change atmosphere flooding hurricanes meteorology weather tropical-cyclones

Homes are flooding outside FEMA's 100-year flood zones, and racial inequality is showing through

New risk models show nearly twice as many properties are at risk from a 100-year flood today than the government's flood maps indicate.

Kevin T. Smiley, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Louisiana State University • conversation
Sept. 24, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: cities poverty flooding hurricanes natural-disasters fema urban floodplains hurricane-harvey

Why do some hurricanes stall, and why is that so hard to forecast?

Hurricane stalling has become common over the past half-century, and their average forward speed has also slowed.

Kimberly Wood, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Mississippi State University • conversation
Sept. 24, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change atmosphere flooding hurricanes meteorology weather tropical-cyclones

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is so intense, it just ran out of storm names – and then two more storms formed

It's only happened twice since naming started in 1950, and there's an unusual twist to where many of the storms are forming this year.

Kimberly Wood, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Mississippi State University • conversation
Sept. 18, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes storms el-nino meteorology natural-disasters oceans atlantic-ocean la-nina tropical-cyclones enso

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is so intense, it just ran out of storm names

In an unusual twist, many of those storms have been forming closer to the US coast.

Kimberly Wood, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Mississippi State University • conversation
Sept. 18, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes storms el-nino meteorology natural-disasters oceans atlantic-ocean la-nina tropical-cyclones enso

What is a hurricane storm surge, and why is it so dangerous?

It's not just about the hurricane. How high a storm surge gets and how far it reaches also has a lot to do with the land.

Anthony C. Didlake Jr., Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University • conversation
Sept. 14, 2020 ~4 min

Tags: climate-change sea-level-rise flooding hurricanes storms natural-disasters storm-surge weather

What is hurricane storm surge, and why is it so dangerous?

It's not just about the hurricane. How high a storm surge gets and how far it reaches also has a lot to do with the land.

Anthony C. Didlake Jr., Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University • conversation
Sept. 14, 2020 ~4 min

Tags: climate-change sea-level-rise flooding hurricanes storms natural-disasters storm-surge weather

Hurricane Laura was the latest storm to strengthen fast, but is rapid intensification really becoming more common?

Laura went from a tropical storm to a major hurricane in less than 24 hours, sending coastal residents scrambling to prepare. Hurricanes Harvey and Michael exploded in strength in similar ways.

Chris Slocum, Physical Scientist, NOAA and Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University • conversation
Aug. 28, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes sea-surface-temperatures meteorology natural-disasters atmospheric-science oceans wind

Hurricane Laura was the latest storm to strengthen fast, but is this rapid intensification really becoming more common?

Laura went from a tropical storm to a major hurricane in less than 24 hours, sending coastal residents scrambling to prepare. Hurricanes Harvey and Michael exploded in strength in similar ways.

Chris Slocum, Physical Scientist, NOAA and Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University • conversation
Aug. 28, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes sea-surface-temperatures meteorology natural-disasters atmospheric-science oceans wind

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