Why some species thrive after catastrophe – rules for making the most of an apocalypse

When the dinosaurs went extinct, some species took over the world. Adaptability, not survivability, explains why.

Nick Longrich, Senior Lecturer in Evolutionary Biology and Paleontology, University of Bath • conversation
July 20, 2020 ~9 min

 evolution  dinosaurs  extinction  palaeontology  mass-extinction  dinosaur-extinction  bird-evolution  ancient-mammals

Prehistoric climate change damaged the ozone layer and led to a mass extinction

New research on the Late Devonian extinction suggests the ozone layer could be naturally depleted as the temperature rises.

John Marshall, Professor of Earth Science, University of Southampton • conversation
June 1, 2020 ~7 min

geology climate-change palaeontology mass-extinction ozone-layer ozone ozone-depletion devonian-period

Dinosaur-killing asteroid struck at worst angle to cause maximum damage – new research

The trajectory of the Chicxulub asteroid led to the most efficient release of gas and projectile rocks – which was disastrous for life on Earth.

Erwan Le Ber, Research Associate, International Ocean Discovery Program, University of Leicester • conversation
May 27, 2020 ~6 min

dinosaurs mass-extinction chicxulub-asteroid chicxulub chicxulub-crater

Will humans go extinct? For all the existential threats, we'll likely be here for a very long time

Large numbers, huge ranges, and adaptibility make the human species very difficult to eradicate

Nick Longrich, Senior Lecturer in Evolutionary Biology and Paleontology, University of Bath • conversation
May 5, 2020 ~8 min

extinction apocalypse mass-extinction

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