The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is so intense, it just ran out of storm names – and then two more storms formed

It's only happened twice since naming started in 1950, and there's an unusual twist to where many of the storms are forming this year.

Kimberly Wood, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Mississippi State University • conversation
Sept. 18, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes storms el-nino meteorology natural-disasters oceans atlantic-ocean la-nina tropical-cyclones enso

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is so intense, it just ran out of storm names

In an unusual twist, many of those storms have been forming closer to the US coast.

Kimberly Wood, Assistant Professor of Meteorology, Mississippi State University • conversation
Sept. 18, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes storms el-nino meteorology natural-disasters oceans atlantic-ocean la-nina tropical-cyclones enso

Hurricane Laura was the latest storm to strengthen fast, but is rapid intensification really becoming more common?

Laura went from a tropical storm to a major hurricane in less than 24 hours, sending coastal residents scrambling to prepare. Hurricanes Harvey and Michael exploded in strength in similar ways.

Chris Slocum, Physical Scientist, NOAA and Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University • conversation
Aug. 28, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes sea-surface-temperatures meteorology natural-disasters atmospheric-science oceans wind

Hurricane Laura was the latest storm to strengthen fast, but is this rapid intensification really becoming more common?

Laura went from a tropical storm to a major hurricane in less than 24 hours, sending coastal residents scrambling to prepare. Hurricanes Harvey and Michael exploded in strength in similar ways.

Chris Slocum, Physical Scientist, NOAA and Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University • conversation
Aug. 28, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes sea-surface-temperatures meteorology natural-disasters atmospheric-science oceans wind

Hurricane Laura was the latest storm with rapid intensification, but is this really becoming more common?

Laura went from a tropical storm to a major hurricane in less than 24 hours, sending coastal residents scrambling to prepare. Hurricanes Harvey and Michael exploded in strength in similar ways.

Chris Slocum, Physical Scientist, NOAA and Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University • conversation
Aug. 28, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes sea-surface-temperatures meteorology natural-disasters atmospheric-science oceans wind

Are hurricanes strengthening more rapidly?

Hurricanes Harvey, Michael and now Laura all had rapid intensification, but is it really becoming more common?

Chris Slocum, Physical Scientist, NOAA and Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University • conversation
Aug. 28, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: climate-change hurricanes meteorology natural-disasters atmospheric-science oceans wind

A rush is on to mine the deep seabed, with effects on ocean life that aren't well understood

Companies are eager to mine the deep ocean for valuable mineral deposits. But scientists are concerned about impacts on sea life, including creatures that haven't even been discovered yet.

Elizabeth Mendenhall, Assistant Professor of Marine Affairs and Political Science, University of Rhode Island • conversation
Aug. 17, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: mining minerals oceans marine-biology metals international-law clean-energy-future law-of-the-sea international-seabed-authority

Marie Tharp pioneered mapping the bottom of the ocean 6 decades ago – scientists are still learning about Earth's last frontier

Born on July 30, 1920, geologist and cartographer Tharp changed scientific thinking about what lay at the bottom of the ocean – not a featureless flat, but rugged and varied terrain.

Suzanne OConnell, Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University • conversation
July 28, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: earth-science geology women-in-science women plate-tectonics maps mapping oceans cartography continents ocean-floor geosciences seamounts marine-geology continental-shelf

Tiny plankton drive processes in the ocean that capture twice as much carbon as scientists thought

Microscopic ocean phytoplankton feed a "biological pump" that carries carbon from the surface to deep waters. Scientists have found that this process stores much more carbon than previously thought.

Ken Buesseler, Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution • conversation
May 21, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: climate-change carbon-sequestration photosynthesis marine-biodiversity oceans marine-biology marine-snow phytoplankton carbon-storage

Scientists at work: Uncovering the mystery of when and where sharks give birth

Researchers are using a newly developed satellite tag to study previously unknown aspects of tiger shark reproduction. This approach could be used on other difficult-to-study shark species.

Hannah Verkamp, PhD Student in Marine Biology, Arizona State University • conversation
April 28, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: reproduction conservation sharks wildlife scientists-at-work oceans marine-biology tagging endangered-species tiger-sharks women-scientists satellite-data the-bahamas

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