Biden's climate change plans can quickly raise the bar, but can they be transformative?

After four years of the US government undoing climate change policies and partnerships, a Biden administration has a chance to rebuild that leadership. But success will require more than quick wins.

Edward R Carr, Professor and Director, International Development, Community, and Environment, Clark University • conversation
Nov. 10, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change policy global-warming economy joe-biden greenhouse-gas-emissions climate-policy us-2020-election

Could employers and states mandate COVID-19 vaccinations? Here's what the courts have ruled

For a COVID-19 vaccine to stop the pandemic, a large percentage of the population will have to get vaccinated. A law professor explains how far government and employer vaccine mandates can legally go.

Debbie Kaminer, Law Professor, Baruch College, CUNY • conversation
July 21, 2020 ~8 min

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Mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations? Here's what states and employers can legally require

For a COVID-19 vaccine to stop the pandemic, a large percentage of the population will have to get vaccinated. A law professor explains how far government and employer vaccine mandates can legally go.

Debbie Kaminer, Law Professor, Baruch College, CUNY • conversation
July 21, 2020 ~8 min

covid-19 coronavirus policy law vaccines measles government supreme-court courts smallpox mandates

Coronavirus deaths in San Francisco vs. New York: What causes such big differences in cities' tolls?

Why one city suffers significantly more deaths than another isn't always obvious. A simple experiment shows how failing to consider certain factors can point policy makers in the wrong direction.

Brian W. Whitcomb, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
June 2, 2020 ~7 min

health cities covid-19 coronavirus politics policy statistics data population modeling health-policy

Fast-acting countries cut their coronavirus death rates while US delays cost thousands of lives

Over the first 100 days of the pandemic, countries that quickly implemented strong policies successfully lowered their death rates faster. There were also some surprises in the successes and failures.

Joshua Aizenman, Professor of International Relations and Economics, University of Southern California – Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences • conversation
May 22, 2020 ~6 min

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Coronavirus: record ethnicity on all death certificates to start building a clearer picture

Coronavirus is hitting some communities harder than others. But a lack of very basic data categorisation means it's difficult for the UK government to tailor its response.

Olivia Stevenson, Head of Public Policy, UCL • conversation
May 11, 2020 ~5 min

 covid-19  coronavirus  policy  data  policymaking  intersectionality  bame

Why coronavirus death rates can't be summed up in one simple number

A lot of numbers are being tossed around about COVID-19 and what to expect in the future. They're being used to make critical public health decisions, but they aren't as simple as they appear.

Jonathan Fuller, Assistant Professor, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
April 10, 2020 ~8 min

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