The behind-the-scenes people and organizations connecting science and decision-making

Before new policy can be based on evidence, decision-makers need to understand the relevant research. Intermediaries between scientists and policymakers translate information and build relationships.

Jennifer Watling Neal, Associate Professor of Psychology, Michigan State University • conversation
June 24, 2021 ~7 min

Competition heats up in the melting Arctic, and the US isn't prepared to counter Russia

Russia is attempting to claim more of the Arctic seabed – an area rich in oil, gas and minerals – and its fleet of icebreakers is helping shipping expand. The US needs some creative ideas to catch up.

Rockford Weitz, Professor of Practice & Director, Fletcher Maritime Studies Program, The Fletcher School, Tufts University • conversation
April 19, 2021 ~9 min

What's really driving coal power's demise?

Contrary to popular belief, falling natural gas prices didn't accelerate coal power plant retirements. Here's what did.

Jeffrey York, Associate Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, University of Colorado Boulder • conversation
March 1, 2021 ~6 min

Biden has a congressional shortcut to cancel Trump’s regulatory rollbacks, but it comes with risks

The Trump administration used this shortcut liberally in 2017, but its potential pitfalls and impact raise a question: Should Congress repeal it?

Daniel Farber, Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Jan. 18, 2021 ~7 min

After a record 22 billion-dollar disasters in 2020, it's time to overhaul US disaster policy – here's how

NOAA released its list of climate and weather disasters that cost the nation more than $1 billion each. Like many climate and weather events this past year, it shattered the record.

Deb Niemeier, Clark Distinguished Chair and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland • conversation
Jan. 8, 2021 ~11 min

After a record 22 billion-dollar disasters in 2020, it's time to make US disaster policy more effective and equitable – here's how

NOAA released its list of climate and weather disasters that cost the nation more than $1 billion each. Like many climate and weather events this past year, it shattered the record.

Deb Niemeier, Clark Distinguished Chair and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland • conversation
Jan. 8, 2021 ~11 min

5 years after Paris: How countries’ climate policies match up to their promises, and who's aiming for net zero emissions

Bold visions for slowing global warming have emerged from all over the world. What's not clear is how countries will meet them.

Dolf Gielen, Payne Institute Fellow, Colorado School of Mines • conversation
Dec. 10, 2020 ~9 min

Biden's climate change plans can quickly raise the bar, but can they be transformative?

After four years of the US government undoing climate change policies and partnerships, a Biden administration has a chance to rebuild that leadership. But success will require more than quick wins.

Edward R Carr, Professor and Director, International Development, Community, and Environment, Clark University • conversation
Nov. 10, 2020 ~7 min

Could employers and states mandate COVID-19 vaccinations? Here's what the courts have ruled

For a COVID-19 vaccine to stop the pandemic, a large percentage of the population will have to get vaccinated. A law professor explains how far government and employer vaccine mandates can legally go.

Debbie Kaminer, Law Professor, Baruch College, CUNY • conversation
July 21, 2020 ~8 min

Mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations? Here's what states and employers can legally require

For a COVID-19 vaccine to stop the pandemic, a large percentage of the population will have to get vaccinated. A law professor explains how far government and employer vaccine mandates can legally go.

Debbie Kaminer, Law Professor, Baruch College, CUNY • conversation
July 21, 2020 ~8 min

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