Male fertility is declining – studies show that environmental toxins could be a reason

People are exposed to toxic substances – like pesticides, chemicals in plastics and radiation – every day. A growing body of research shows that this exposure is causing a decline in male fertility.

Ryan P. Smith, Associate Professor of Urology, University of Virginia • conversation
July 30, 2021 ~9 min

Why are some mushrooms poisonous?

Poison can be a deadly defense that helps a mushroom make sure its spores are spread to new places to grow into baby mushrooms.

Karen Hughes, Professor of Mycology, University of Tennessee • conversation
June 7, 2021 ~6 min

Male fertility: how everyday chemicals are destroying sperm counts in humans and animals

Our chemical environment appears responsible for an alarming plummet in sperm counts – in humans and in animals.

Gary Hutchison, Professor of Toxicology and Dean of Applied Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University • conversation
April 14, 2021 ~9 min

Virgin births from parthenogenesis: How females from some species can reproduce without males

Parthenogenesis, a form of reproduction in which an egg develops into an embryo without being fertilized by sperm, might be more common than you realized.

Mercedes Burns, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County • conversation
Dec. 15, 2020 ~6 min

Bloodthirsty tsetse flies nurse their young, one live birth at a time – understanding this unusual strategy could help fight the disease they spread

This insect's unique reproductive biology could lead to new ways to control the species in the environment – and prevent the deadly sleeping sickness it spreads to people.

Geoff Attardo, Assistant Professor of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis • conversation
July 29, 2020 ~7 min

Scientists at work: Uncovering the mystery of when and where sharks give birth

Researchers are using a newly developed satellite tag to study previously unknown aspects of tiger shark reproduction. This approach could be used on other difficult-to-study shark species.

Hannah Verkamp, PhD Student in Marine Biology, Arizona State University • conversation
April 28, 2020 ~9 min

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