Why a green electricity grid depends on weather forecasts improving

Ramping up fossil power sources is no longer a good option in an energy-supply crisis. Bring in the weather forecasters.

Hannah Bloomfield, Postdoctoral Research Assistant, University of Reading • conversation
Jan. 14, 2021 ~5 min

What is a derecho? An atmospheric scientist explains these rare but dangerous storm systems

Hurricane and tornado winds spin in circles, but there's another, equally dangerous storm type where winds barrel straight ahead. They're called derechos, and are most common in summer.

Russ Schumacher, Associate Professor of Atmospheric Science and Colorado State Climatologist, Colorado State University • conversation
June 15, 2020 ~9 min

Advanced cyclone forecasting is leading to early action – and it's saving thousands of lives

Massive cyclone that hit India and Bangladesh could have been so much worse.

Hannah Cloke, Professor of Hydrology, University of Reading • conversation
June 1, 2020 ~6 min

Cyclone Amphan: supercomputers predicted it well in advance – saving thousands of lives

Massive cyclone that hit India and Bangladesh could have been so much worse.

Hannah Cloke, Professor of Hydrology, University of Reading • conversation
June 1, 2020 ~6 min

Grounded aircraft could make weather forecasts less reliable

More than one million weather observations were made by aircraft each day in 2019. Since the pandemic started, these have dropped by 90%.

Matthew Blackett, Reader in Physical Geography and Natural Hazards, Coventry University • conversation
May 13, 2020 ~6 min

​Tornadoes that strike at night are more deadly and require more effective warning systems

In the Southeast US, tornadoes strike at night more often than in other regions. This poses special challenges for getting early warnings to the public.

Alisa Hass, Assistant Professor of Geoscience, Middle Tennessee State University • conversation
March 5, 2020 ~8 min

Atmospheric river storms can drive costly flooding – and climate change is making them stronger

Earth's biggest rivers are streams of warm water vapor in the atmosphere that can cause huge rain and snowfall over land. Climate change is making them longer, wetter and stronger.

Tom Corringham, Postdoctoral Scholar in Climate, Atmospheric Science and Physical Oceanography, University of California San Diego • conversation
Jan. 27, 2020 ~8 min

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