Is COVID-19 infecting wild animals? We're testing species from bats to seals to find out

COVID-19 has been found in pets, zoo animals and in a wild mink in Utah. Monitoring wildlife for COVID-19 is important for animals and humans, both of whom face risks from a jumping virus.

Kaitlin Sawatzki, Postdoctoral Infectious Disease Researcher, Tufts University • conversation
Jan. 19, 2021 ~8 min

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Pikas are adapting to climate change remarkably well, contrary to many predictions

Pikas – small cousins of rabbits – live mainly in the mountainous US west. They've been called a climate change poster species, but they're more adaptable than many people think.

Andrew Smith, Professor Emeritus of Life Sciences, Arizona State University • conversation
Jan. 7, 2021 ~8 min

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Why David Attenborough cannot be replaced

Wildlife television as we know it was constructed around Attenborough. Take him away and the whole thing needs to be reinvented.

Jean-Baptiste Gouyon, Associate professor in Science Communication, UCL • conversation
Jan. 5, 2021 ~7 min

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Llamas are having a moment in the US, but they've been icons in South America for millennia

Llama toys, therapy lamas, petting zoo llamas: llamas are hot in the US, surpassing unicorns in popularity, but their relationship with South American people stretches over 7,000 years.

Emily Wakild, Professor of History and Director, Environmental Studies Program, Boise State University • conversation
Dec. 18, 2020 ~8 min

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Fences have big effects on land and wildlife around the world that are rarely measured

Millions of miles of fences crisscross the Earth's surface. They divide ecosystems and affect wild species in ways that often are harmful, but are virtually unstudied.

Wenjing Xu, PhD Candidate in Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Nov. 30, 2020 ~10 min

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Why do tigers have stripes?

How do tigers – a top predator – successfully hunt their prey when they have bright orange fur? The secret's in their stripes!

Andrew Cushing, Assistant Professor in Zoological Medicine, University of Tennessee • conversation
Nov. 23, 2020 ~6 min

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Why do tigers have different stripe patterns?

How do tigers – a top predator – successfully hunt their prey when they have bright orange fur? The secret's in their stripes!

Andrew Cushing, Assistant Professor in Zoological Medicine, University of Tennessee • conversation
Nov. 23, 2020 ~6 min

vision wildlife curious-kids curious-kids-us predator-prey-interaction tigers camouflage captive-wildlife big-cats predator-and-prey wildlife-crime

Three ways to head off the next pandemic in the wild meat trade

Needed: less wild meat in cities, more wildlife experts in public health.

Julia E. Fa, Professor of Biodiversity and Human Development, Manchester Metropolitan University • conversation
Oct. 29, 2020 ~6 min

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Biodiversity: where the world is making progress – and where it's not

The world missed all 20 targets for stemming the tide of biodiversity loss. But there has been some progress over the last decade.

Tom Oliver, Professor of Applied Ecology, University of Reading • conversation
Sept. 30, 2020 ~8 min

climate-change biodiversity extinction united-nations wildlife invasive-species habitat-loss species-loss unep convention-on-biodiversity

How to reverse global wildlife declines by 2050

Wildlife populations have plummeted by 68% since 1970. But we have a plan to turn things around.

Piero Visconti, Research Scholar, Ecosystem Services and Management Programme, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) • conversation
Sept. 14, 2020 ~6 min

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