The Moon and stars are a compass for nocturnal animals – but light pollution is leading them astray

Towns and cities create an orange glow on the horizon at night. It's so widespread that it even disturbs sea creatures.

Stuart Jenkins, Professor of Marine Ecology, Bangor University • conversation
yesterday ~6 min

Tags: moon wildlife marine-biology stars milky-way light-pollution artificial-light night-sky coastal-areas

How deforestation helps deadly viruses jump from animals to humans

Yellow fever, malaria and Ebola all spilled over from animals to humans at the edges of tropical forests. The new coronavirus is the latest zoonosis.

Maria Anice Mureb Sallum, Professor of Epidemiology, Universidade de São Paulo • conversation
June 25, 2020 ~11 min

Tags: health climate covid-19 coronavirus ebola pandemic malaria forests disease epidemics wildlife deforestation bats wildlife-trade monkeys mosquitoes yellow-fever zoonoses vectors carrying-capacity

Noisy humans make birds sleep with one eye open – but lockdown offered a reprieve

Noise pollution can cause long-term stress and harm to wildlife.

Graeme Shannon, Lecturer in Zoology, Bangor University • conversation
June 25, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: birds sleep wildlife lockdown noise-pollution coastal-ecosystems

How forest loss has changed biodiversity across the globe over the last 150 years

New findings show how changes in land use have complex effects on animal and plant species.

Isla Myers-Smith, Chancellor's Fellow in Global Change Ecology, University of Edinburgh • conversation
June 18, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: biodiversity trees forests wildlife deforestation forest-cover woodland forest-loss

Can Asia end its uncontrolled consumption of wildlife? Here's how North America did it a century ago

In the 1800s, Americans hunted many wild species near or into extinction. Then in the early 1900s, the US shifted from uncontrolled consumption of wildlife to conservation. Could Asia follow suit?

Roland Kays, Research Associate Professor of Wildlife and Scientist at NC Museum of Natural Sciences, North Carolina State University • conversation
June 17, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: covid-19 china wildlife fishing wildlife-conservation bison endangered-species us-history wildlife-trade asia hunting ivory-ban wildlife-management

With construction paused, let's rethink roads and railway projects to protect people and nature

Road and rail construction is booming in sub-Saharan Africa, but the pandemic has brought a welcome pause for reflection.

Brock Bersaglio, Lecturer in Environment and Development, University of Birmingham • conversation
June 15, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: kenya wildlife roads tanzania zambia sub-saharan-africa railways motorways

COVID-19 is eroding scientific field work – and our knowledge of how the world is changing

The COVID-19 pandemic is interrupting scientific field work across North America, leaving blank spots in important data sets and making it harder to track ecological change.

Casey Setash, PhD student in Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University • conversation
May 19, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: climate-change covid-19 biology nature ecology coronavirus-2020 wildlife ducks phenology massachusetts migratory-birds colorado thoreau field-research

Environmental regulations likely to be first casualties in post-pandemic recovery

As governments race to revive economic growth, expect a bonfire of green tape.

Meinhard Doelle, Professor of Law, Dalhousie University • conversation
May 14, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: covid-19 coronavirus wildlife environmental-regulation green-tape

You're not going far from home – and neither are the animals you spy out your window

With careful observation, you can start to recognize that one sassy squirrel or the cardinal pair who call your neighborhood home.

Julian Avery, Assistant Research Professor of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Pennsylvania State University • conversation
May 11, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: birds wildlife squirrels urban-wildlife habitat lizards birdwatching rabbits wildlife-ecology migratory-birds bird-watching

What are Asian giant hornets, and are they really dangerous? 5 questions answered

Are 'murder hornets' from Asia invading North America? A Japanese entomologist who's been stung by one and lived to tell the tale explains what's true about these predatory insects.

Akito Y Kawahara, Associate Professor and Curator of Insects, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida • conversation
May 11, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: insects agriculture wildlife japan entomology pollinators asia invasive-species honeybees wild-bees

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