Harvard researchers create DNA ‘propellers’

Understanding how DNA and proteins interact — or fail to — could help answer fundamental biological questions about human health and disease.

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy | July 19, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology biomechanics biotechnology cell-biology chemistry dna micromachines microscopy molecular-biology nanotechnology nature optics xiaowei-zhuang

Innovation gives soft robots new, complex movements

The first soft ring oscillator gets plushy robots to roll, undulate, sort, meter liquids, and swallow.

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy | July 8, 2019 | harvard
~6 mins   

Tags: science-technology chemistry george-whitesides mechanotherapy medical-technology pneumatics science soft-robotics

Harvard researchers present nanowire devices update

A new technique speeds creation of nanowire devices, boosting research into what’s happening inside cells.

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy | July 2, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology anqi-zhang artificial-intelligence brain charles-m-lieber chemistry medical-technology nanotechnology nature-nanotechnology

Harvard researchers find gut microbes can lessen effectiveness of medicines

Study published in Science shows that gut microbes can chew up medications, with serious side effects.

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy | June 19, 2019 | harvard
~9 mins   

Tags: science-technology caitlin-mcdermott-murphy chemistry chemistry-and-chemical-biology emily-balskus fas graduate-school-of-arts-and-sciences gut-bacteria microbiome parkinsons-disease science vayu-maini-rekdal

Harvard chemist teases out why drugs work (or don’t)

Assistant Professor Brian Liau of the Chemistry and Chemical Biology Department has answered the question of why some new drugs for acute myeloid leukemia don’t work by combining CRISPR gene editing with small-molecule inhibitor treatments in a technique he calls CRISPR-suppressor scanning.

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy | May 6, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology acute-myeloid-leukemia aml brian-liau chemistry chemistry-and-chemical-biology crispr leukemia nature-chemical-biology

Harvard study looks at how microbes produce cancer fighting compound

Emily Balskus and a team of researchers untangled how soil bacteria are able to manufacture streptozotocin, an antibiotic and anti-cancer compound.

Peter Reuell | Feb. 7, 2019 | harvard
~4 mins   

Tags: science-technology bacteria balskus basic-research biology cancer chemistry chemotherapy emily-balskus enzyme faculty-of-arts-and-sciences fas harvard nature nitrosamine peter-reuell reuell soil soil-bacteria streptozotocin

Inosine could be a potential route to the first RNA, Harvard study says

In a paper published in PNAS, Jack W. Szostak, professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Harvard, along with graduate student Seohyun (Chris) Kim, suggest that RNA could have started with a different set of nucleotide bases. In place of guanine, RNA could have relied on a surrogate, inosine.

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy | Dec. 10, 2018 | harvard
~4 mins   

Tags: science-technology chemistry-and-chemical-biology faculty-of-arts-and-sciences fas harvard inosine jack-szostak life origins-of-life rna szostak

Inosine could be a potential route to the first RNA, Harvard study says

In a paper published in PNAS, Jack W. Szostak, professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Harvard, along with graduate student Seohyun (Chris) Kim, suggest that RNA could have started with a different set of nucleotide bases. In place of guanine, RNA could have relied on a surrogate, inosine.

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy | Dec. 10, 2018 | harvard
~4 mins   

Tags: science-technology chemistry-and-chemical-biology faculty-of-arts-and-sciences fas harvard inosine jack-szostak life origins-of-life rna szostak

Study uses rings in teeth to understand the environment Neanderthals faced

By examining the teeth of Neanderthal infants, a team of researchers was able to glean insight into nursing and weaning behavior as well as winter and summer cycles. The study even found evidence that the Neanderthals had been exposed to lead — the earliest such exposure ever recorded in any human ancestor.

Peter Reuell | Dec. 3, 2018 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology basic-research daniel-green faculty-of-arts-and-sciences fas green harvard lead lead-exposure neanderthal neanderthals nursing peter-reuell reuell seasonal-changes seasonal-cycles seasons teeth tooth-chemistry tooth-rings weaning winter-and-summer-cycles

Study uses rings in teeth to understand the environment Neanderthals faced

By examining the teeth of Neanderthal infants, a team of researchers was able to glean insight into nursing and weaning behavior as well as winter and summer cycles. The study even found evidence that the Neanderthals had been exposed to lead — the earliest such exposure ever recorded in any human ancestor.

Peter Reuell | Dec. 3, 2018 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology basic-research daniel-green faculty-of-arts-and-sciences fas green harvard lead lead-exposure neanderthal neanderthals nursing peter-reuell reuell seasonal-changes seasonal-cycles seasons teeth tooth-chemistry tooth-rings weaning winter-and-summer-cycles

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