2014 Scottish independence referendum

The 2014 Scottish independence referendum was an independence referendum held on 18 September 2014 concerning Scottish independence from the United Kingdom.[1] The referendum question was, "Should Scotland be an independent country?", which voters answered with "Yes" or "No".[2] The "No" side won with 2,001,926 (55.3%) voting against independence and 1,617,989 (44.7%) voting in favour. The turnout of 84.6% was the highest recorded for an election or referendum in the United Kingdom since the January 1910 general election, which was held before the introduction of universal suffrage.

Scottish independence referendum
18 September 2014 (2014-09-18)

Should Scotland be an independent country?
LocationScotland
OutcomeScotland rejects independence and remains a constituent country of the United Kingdom
Results
Response Votes  %
Yes 1,617,989 44.70%
No 2,001,926 55.30%
Valid votes 3,619,915 99.91%
Invalid or blank votes 3,429 0.09%
Total votes 3,623,344 100.00%
Registered voters/turnout 4,283,392 84.59%

Results by council area
Note: saturation of colour denotes strength of vote

The Scottish Independence Referendum Act 2013 set out the arrangements for the referendum and was passed by the Scottish Parliament in November 2013, following an agreement between the devolved Scottish government and the Government of the United Kingdom. The independence proposal required a simple majority to pass. All European Union (EU) or Commonwealth citizens residing in Scotland age 16 or over could vote, with some exceptions, which produced a total electorate of almost 4,300,000 people. This was the first time that the electoral franchise was extended to include 16- and 17-year-olds in Scotland.

Yes Scotland was the main campaign group for independence, while Better Together was the main campaign group in favour of maintaining the union. Many other campaign groups, political parties, businesses, newspapers, and prominent individuals were also involved. Prominent issues raised during the referendum included what currency an independent Scotland would use, public expenditure, EU membership, and North Sea oil. An exit poll revealed that retention of the pound sterling was the deciding factor for those who voted No, while "disaffection with Westminster politics" was the deciding factor for those who voted Yes.[3]