2019 Canadian federal election

The 2019 Canadian federal election (formally the 43rd Canadian general election) was held on October 21, 2019, members of the House of Commons were elected to the 43rd Canadian Parliament. The writs of election for the 2019 election were issued by Governor General Julie Payette on September 11, 2019.

2019 Canadian federal election

 2015 October 21, 2019 2021 

All 338 seats in the House of Commons
170 seats needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Turnout67.0%[1] (1.3pp)
  First party Second party Third party
 
Leader Justin Trudeau Andrew Scheer Yves-François Blanchet
Party Liberal Conservative Bloc Québécois
Leader since April 14, 2013 May 27, 2017 January 17, 2019
Leader's seat Papineau Regina—Qu'Appelle Beloeil—Chambly[lower-alpha 1]
Last election 184 seats, 39.47% 99 seats, 31.89% 10 seats, 4.66%
Seats before 177 95 10
Seats won 157 121 32
Seat change 20 26 22
Popular vote 6,018,728 6,239,227 1,387,030
Percentage 33.12% 34.34% 7.63%
Swing 6.40pp 2.52pp 3.03pp

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
 
Leader Jagmeet Singh Elizabeth May Maxime Bernier
Party New Democratic Green People's
Leader since October 1, 2017 August 27, 2006 September 14, 2018
Leader's seat Burnaby South Saanich—Gulf Islands Beauce
(lost re-election)
Last election 44 seats, 19.71% 1 seat, 3.45% pre-creation
Seats before 39 2 1
Seats won 24 3 0
Seat change 15 1 1
Popular vote 2,903,722 1,189,607 294,092
Percentage 15.98% 6.55% 1.62%
Swing 3.78pp 3.07pp pre-creation


Prime Minister before election

Justin Trudeau
Liberal

Prime Minister after election

Justin Trudeau
Liberal

With 33.12% of the vote for the Liberal Party, led by incumbent Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the 2019 election set an all-time record for the lowest vote share for a party that would go on to form a single-party minority government.[2] The Liberals lost the popular vote to the Conservative Party by one percent,[3] marking only the second time in Canadian history that a governing party formed a government while receiving less than 35 percent of the national popular vote (the first time in fact being the inaugural federal election after Confederation).

The Conservatives, led by Andrew Scheer, won 121 seats and remained the Official Opposition. The Bloc Québécois, led by Yves-François Blanchet, won 32 seats to regain official party status and became the third party for the first time since 2008. The New Democratic Party, led by Jagmeet Singh, won 24 seats, its worst result since 2004. The Green Party, led by Elizabeth May, saw its best election results with three seats and for the first time received over one million votes. The Greens also elected their first MP outside of British Columbia, Jenica Atwin in Fredericton, New Brunswick.[3] Independent MP Jody Wilson-Raybould won her seat and was the first independent to win a seat in over a decade. In their first election, the People's Party failed to win any seats, as leader Maxime Bernier lost his own seat in Beauce, a seat he won as a Conservative in the previous four elections before forming his own party following his unsuccessful bid for the Conservative Party's leadership.

The Liberal Party saw its majority government won in the 2015 federal election cut down to a 157 seat minority, and the Liberals subsequently formed a minority government.[4] Following the election, Trudeau ruled out a coalition and his new cabinet was sworn in on November 20, 2019.[5]