Addington,_New_Zealand

Addington, New Zealand

Addington, New Zealand

Suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand


Addington is one of the older suburbs of Christchurch, New Zealand. It was originally open grassland with patches of shrubland which soon became a working-class suburb which was heavily industrialised with factories and large premises of railway workshops built along Main South Line. It is sited 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) south-west of the city centre.[3]

Quick Facts Country, City ...
Upper Riccarton Riccarton Christchurch Central City
Middleton
Addington
Sydenham
Hillmorton Spreydon

As an inner city suburb, Addington has a mix of residential, retail and light industrial properties, which grew significantly after professional and commercial companies were displaced from the central city after the 2011 Christchurch earthquake.[4]

Geography

Addington is sited between the suburbs of Spreydon and Riccarton, with Blenheim Road providing the boundary to Riccarton. The cluster of the shops in the suburb of Spreydon also provide a clear boundary between the suburbs. To the east of the suburb is Sydenham and to the west is Middleton.[5]

History

19th century

Addington Railway Workshops, 2 May 1898

For the first decade after the founding of Christchurch in 1850, Addington was farmland, consisting of large rural sections. In the early 1860s, the railway was surveyed through the area and subdivision of the larger sections began. Factories moved in; wool and grain sheds opened; and with the industry came working class residential settlement.

Development continued throughout the 19th century: the city's sale yards opened in 1874 and the railway workshops were moved to Addington in 1880. By the time the show grounds were opened in 1887, Addington had become an important suburb in the industrial and social life of Christchurch.[6] In 1874 the Addington Prison was built under the guidance of Benjamin Mountfort in Lincoln Road; it closed in 1999 and the Mountfort cell block and remaining perimeter walls are a Heritage New Zealand Historic Place Category 2[7] and is now a hostel.[8] The suburb was named for the country residence of Archbishop John Sumner, one of the leading members of the Canterbury Association, and who was buried in St Mary's Church, Addington in England.[9]

20th century

The New Zealand Railways Department's Addington Workshops were situated in Addington until their closure in the 1990s; the historic concrete water-tower survives,[10][11] next to the new Christchurch railway station. The tower has served as the centrepoint for the adjacent Tower Junction shopping complex. The previous railway station is located on Moorhouse Avenue in neighbouring Sydenham. The new station at Addington opened in 1994 and now serves the TranzAlpine, which takes tourists on the 223-kilometre (139 mi) coast-to-coast journey from Christchurch to Greymouth.[12] Addington was the home of the oldest blending plant in the Southern Hemisphere until it was demolished after sustaining some damage in the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake. The demolition of the plant sparked some controversy as the plant had been lined up to be carefully taken apart in an attempt to save Oregon timber valued at over $600,000.[13]

Demographics

Addington comprises four statistical areas. Addington North is primarily industrial, with the Main South Line running through it. Addington West and Addington East are residential. Tower Junction has a shopping centre, Addington Racecourse, and light industrial premises, and also includes two rest homes, which result in an unusually high median age for residents.

More information Name, Area (km2) ...

Residential areas

The residential areas of Addington, comprising the statistical areas of Addington West and Addington East cover 1.13 km2 (0.44 sq mi).[1] They had an estimated population of 5,860 as of June 2023, with a population density of 5,186 people per km2.

More information Year, Pop. ...

The statistical areas of Addington West and Addington East had a population of 5,346 at the 2018 New Zealand census, an increase of 315 people (6.3%) since the 2013 census, and an increase of 1,059 people (24.7%) since the 2006 census. There were 1,986 households, comprising 2,817 males and 2,529 females, giving a sex ratio of 1.11 males per female, with 696 people (13.0%) aged under 15 years, 1,548 (29.0%) aged 15 to 29, 2,505 (46.9%) aged 30 to 64, and 597 (11.2%) aged 65 or older.

Ethnicities were 60.4% European/Pākehā, 10.7% Māori, 4.5% Pasifika, 29.8% Asian, and 4.0% other ethnicities. People may identify with more than one ethnicity.

The percentage of people born overseas was 41.0, compared with 27.1% nationally.

Although some people chose not to answer the census's question about religious affiliation, 40.1% had no religion, 41.7% were Christian, 0.5% had Māori religious beliefs, 4.3% were Hindu, 2.1% were Muslim, 1.1% were Buddhist and 4.2% had other religions.

Of those at least 15 years old, 1,212 (26.1%) people had a bachelor's or higher degree, and 780 (16.8%) people had no formal qualifications. 399 people (8.6%) earned over $70,000 compared to 17.2% nationally. The employment status of those at least 15 was that 2,544 (54.7%) people were employed full-time, 519 (11.2%) were part-time, and 183 (3.9%) were unemployed.[18]

Addington North

Addington North covers 0.43 km2 (0.17 sq mi).[1] It had an estimated population of 20 as of June 2023,[2] with a population density of 47 people per km2.

Statistics New Zealand do not publish detailed statistics for areas of very low population.

Tower Junction

Tower Junction covers 1.07 km2 (0.41 sq mi).[1] It had an estimated population of 200 as of June 2023,[2] with a population density of 187 people per km2.

More information Year, Pop. ...

Tower Junction had a population of 120 at the 2018 New Zealand census, an increase of 81 people (207.7%) since the 2013 census, and an increase of 96 people (400.0%) since the 2006 census. There were 12 households, comprising 42 males and 78 females, giving a sex ratio of 0.54 males per female. The median age was 80.6 years (compared with 37.4 years nationally), with 3 people (2.5%) aged under 15 years, 15 (12.5%) aged 15 to 29, 15 (12.5%) aged 30 to 64, and 84 (70.0%) aged 65 or older.

Ethnicities were 80.0% European/Pākehā, 2.5% Māori, 5.0% Pasifika, and 15.0% Asian. People may identify with more than one ethnicity.

The percentage of people born overseas was 30.0, compared with 27.1% nationally.

Although some people chose not to answer the census's question about religious affiliation, 22.5% had no religion, 70.0% were Christian and 2.5% had other religions.

Of those at least 15 years old, 12 (10.3%) people had a bachelor's or higher degree, and 45 (38.5%) people had no formal qualifications. The median income was $22,500, compared with $31,800 nationally. 3 people (2.6%) earned over $70,000 compared to 17.2% nationally. The employment status of those at least 15 was that 24 (20.5%) people were employed full-time, and 6 (5.1%) were part-time.[19]

Economy

Tower Junction shopping centre is located in Addington, owned by Ngāi Tahu.[20] It opened in 2002,[20] and was redeveloped in 2018.[21] It covers 37,000 m2 and has 40 tenants, including Bunnings Warehouse and Harvey Norman.[20]

Features

Addington Cemetery

The suburb is home to multiple sporting and events complexes, including Horncastle Arena, Rugby League Park (currently branded as Orangetheory Stadium), and Addington Raceway. Along with Riccarton Racecourse, the Raceway is one of Christchurch's primary horse-racing venues, focusing predominantly on harness racing, and is the home to the annual New Zealand Trotting Cup. Addington is also close to many other event venues, notably Hagley Park to the north and the Canterbury Agricultural Park to the southwest.

Central to Addington's residential area is St Mary's Anglican Church, which is a historic building surrounded by the spacious grounds and trees of Church Square. The grounds are used by the community for galas, pancake races (on Shrove Tuesday) fairs and weddings. The buildings and surrounding area is registered by Heritage New Zealand as a historic area, with registration number 7516.[22]

Addington was also formerly home to an immigration barrack.[23]

The Court Theatre, whose buildings were damaged in the earthquake, relocated to "The Shed" and started operating in 2011.[24]

Manuka Cottage is a community house that serves the interests of a wide variety of people and local community groups.[25]

Education

Addington School is sited in the south–west corner of the suburb where the boundary with Spreydon is not clearly defined.[26] It is a contributing primary school for years 1 to 6.[27] It has a roll of 290 students. The school opened in 1881 as West Christchurch Side School,[28] the original building was built from timber but burnt down in 1909.[29]

Sacred Heart School is a Catholic state-integrated full primary school for years 1 to 8.[30] It has a roll of 170 students. Sacred Heart opened in 1877.[31]


References

  1. "ArcGIS Web Application". statsnz.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved 25 September 2021.
  2. Wilson 2018, p. 13–15.
  3. Wilson 2018, p. 297.
  4. Wilson 2018, p. 21–22.
  5. "Addington Prison". New Zealand Heritage List/Rārangi Kōrero. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 11 October 2022.
  6. "Get locked up in a historic prison hotel". The New Zealand Herald. 2 June 2017. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  7. Reed, A. W. (2010). Peter Dowling (ed.). Place Names of New Zealand. Rosedale, North Shore: Raupo. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-14-320410-7.
  8. Wilson 2005, p. 140.
  9. Atkinson, Neill (2010). "Railways – Workshops". Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  10. Gibbs, Tatiana (19 December 2023). "Carriage disconnects from TranzAlpine passenger train". The Press. Christchurch, New Zealand. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  11. "Statistical area 1 dataset for 2018 Census". Statistics New Zealand. March 2020. Addington West (326100) and Addington East (327400).
  12. "Statistical area 1 dataset for 2018 Census". Statistics New Zealand. March 2020. Tower Junction (325500). 2018 Census place summary: Tower Junction
  13. "About Tower Junction". shoptowerjunction.co.nz. Ngāi Tahu.
  14. "Church of St Mary the Virgin Historic Area". NZHPT. Retrieved 2 September 2011.
  15. "Immigration Barracks, Addington". The Star. Christchurch, New Zealand. 9 August 1872. p. 2. Retrieved 19 May 2024.
  16. Gates, Charlie (29 June 2022). "Court Theatre's building and land in Addington sold for development". Stuff. Archived from the original on 5 July 2022. Retrieved 3 May 2024.
  17. "Manuka Cottage – Addington Community House". Mental Health Education and Resource Centre. Archived from the original on 23 December 2018. Retrieved 19 May 2024.
  18. V.C Browne NZ Aerial Photograph Collection, 1320–1353
  19. Clarke, Rae (2006). Addington Primary School – 125 Years 1881–2006. p. 13.
  20. Clarke, Rae (2006). Addington Primary School – 125 Years 1881–2006. p. 16.
  21. "History". Sacred Heart School. Retrieved 25 September 2021.

Works cited


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