Admissibility (ECHR)


Under the European Convention on Human Rights, admissibility governs whether an individual or inter-State application will be accepted for consideration on the merits and progress to a full case. Normally, all domestic legal remedies must be exhausted before an application will be considered by the European Court of Human Rights.[1][2][3] Inter-State cases are subject to more lenient admissibility rules than applications by individuals.[4]

References


  1. Deshko, Lyudmyla (2018). "Application of Legal Entities to the European Court of Human Rights: a Significant Disadvantage as the Condition of Admissibility". Croatian International Relations Review. 24 (83): 84–103. doi:10.2478/cirr-2018-0015.
  2. Vogiatzis, Nikos (2016). "THE ADMISSIBILITY CRITERION UNDER ARTICLE 35(3)(b) ECHR: A 'SIGNIFICANT DISADVANTAGE' TO HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION?". International and Comparative Law Quarterly. 65 (1): 185–211. doi:10.1017/S0020589315000573.
  3. Vogiatzis, Nikos (2016). "The Admissibility Criterion under Article 35(3)(b) ECHR: A Significant Disadvantage to Human Rights Protection". International and Comparative Law Quarterly. 65: 185.
  4. Ulfstein, Geir (24 January 2020). "Inter-State Applications under the European Convention on Human Rights: Strengths and Challenges". EJIL: Talk!. Retrieved 7 January 2021.