Basidiomycota

Basidiomycota (/bəˌsɪdi.mˈktə/)[2] is one of two large divisions that, together with the Ascomycota, constitute the subkingdom Dikarya (often referred to as the "higher fungi") within the kingdom Fungi. Members are known as Basidiomycetes.[3] More specifically, Basidiomycota includes these groups: mushrooms, puffballs, stinkhorns, bracket fungi, other polypores, jelly fungi, boletes, chanterelles, earth stars, smuts, bunts, rusts, mirror yeasts, and Cryptococcus, the human pathogenic yeast. Basidiomycota are filamentous fungi composed of hyphae (except for basidiomycota-yeast) and reproduce sexually via the formation of specialized club-shaped end cells called basidia that normally bear external meiospores (usually four). These specialized spores are called basidiospores.[4] However, some Basidiomycota are obligate asexual reproducers. Basidiomycota that reproduce asexually (discussed below) can typically be recognized as members of this division by gross similarity to others, by the formation of a distinctive anatomical feature (the clamp connection), cell wall components, and definitively by phylogenetic molecular analysis of DNA sequence data.

Basidiomycota
Basidiomycetes from Ernst Haeckel's 1904 Kunstformen der Natur
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Subkingdom: Dikarya
Division: Basidiomycota
Moore, R.T. 1980[1]
Subdivisions/Classes
Agaricomycotina
Pucciniomycotina
Ustilaginomycotina
Class Incertae sedis (no subdivisions)
Wallemiomycetes

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