Belgian Resistance

The Belgian Resistance (French: Résistance belge, Dutch: Belgisch verzet) collectively refers to the resistance movements opposed to the German occupation of Belgium during World War II. Within Belgium, resistance was fragmented between many separate organizations, divided by region and political stances. The resistance included both men and women from both Walloon and Flemish parts of the country. Aside from sabotage of military infrastructure in the country and assassinations of collaborators, these groups also published large numbers of underground newspapers, gathered intelligence and maintained various escape networks that helped Allied airmen trapped behind enemy lines escape from German-occupied Europe.

Members of the Belgian resistance with a Canadian soldier in Bruges, September 1944[lower-alpha 1]

During the war, it is estimated that approximately five percent of the national population were involved in some form of resistance activity,[2] while some estimates put the number of resistance members killed at over 19,000; roughly 25 percent of its "active" members.[3]