Bernoulli distribution

In probability theory and statistics, the Bernoulli distribution, named after Swiss mathematician Jacob Bernoulli,[1] is the discrete probability distribution of a random variable which takes the value 1 with probability and the value 0 with probability . Less formally, it can be thought of as a model for the set of possible outcomes of any single experiment that asks a yes–no question. Such questions lead to outcomes that are boolean-valued: a single bit whose value is success/yes/true/one with probability p and failure/no/false/zero with probability q. It can be used to represent a (possibly biased) coin toss where 1 and 0 would represent "heads" and "tails" (or vice versa), respectively, and p would be the probability of the coin landing on heads or tails, respectively. In particular, unfair coins would have

Bernoulli distribution
Probability mass function

Three examples of Bernoulli distribution:

   and
   and
   and
Parameters


Support
PMF

CDF
Mean
Median
Mode
Variance
MAD
Skewness
Ex. kurtosis
Entropy
MGF
CF
PGF
Fisher information

The Bernoulli distribution is a special case of the binomial distribution where a single trial is conducted (so n would be 1 for such a binomial distribution). It is also a special case of the two-point distribution, for which the possible outcomes need not be 0 and 1.


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