Californication (album)

Californication is the seventh studio album by American rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers. It was released on June 8, 1999, on Warner Bros. Records and was produced by Rick Rubin. Californication marked the return of John Frusciante, who had previously appeared on Mother's Milk and Blood Sugar Sex Magik, to replace Dave Navarro as the band's guitarist. Frusciante's return was credited with changing the band's sound altogether, producing a notable shift in style from the music recorded with Navarro. The album's subject material incorporated various sexual innuendos commonly associated with the band, but also contained more varied themes than previous outings, including death, contemplations of suicide, California, drugs, globalization, and travel.

Californication
Studio album by
ReleasedJune 8, 1999 (1999-06-08)
RecordedDecember 1998 – March 1999
StudioCello Studios, Los Angeles, California
Genre
Length56:24
LabelWarner Bros.
ProducerRick Rubin
Red Hot Chili Peppers chronology
Under the Covers: Essential Red Hot Chili Peppers
(1998)
Californication
(1999)
By the Way
(2002)
Red Hot Chili Peppers studio album chronology
One Hot Minute
(1995)
Californication
(1999)
By the Way
(2002)
Singles from Californication
  1. "Scar Tissue"
    Released: May 25, 1999
  2. "Around the World"
    Released: September 14, 1999
  3. "Otherside"
    Released: January 11, 2000
  4. "Californication"
    Released: May 20, 2000
  5. "Road Trippin'"
    Released: November 18, 2000
  6. "Parallel Universe"
    Released: March 24, 2001 (promotional)

Californication is the Chili Peppers' most commercially successful studio release internationally, with over 15 million copies sold worldwide,[3] and more than 6 million in the United States alone.[4] As of 2002, the album had sold over 4 million copies in Europe.[5] The record produced several hits for the band, including "Otherside", "Californication" and the Grammy Award-winning "Scar Tissue". Californication peaked at number three on the US Billboard 200.

The record marked a significant change in style for the band: Rolling Stone's Greg Tate noted that "while all previous Chili Peppers projects have been highly spirited, Californication dares to be spiritual and epiphanic".[6] Another critic, Billboard's Paul Verna, mentioned that the album brought out "the group's softer, melodic side", as opposed to their previous six albums.[7]


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