Cambridge Assessment International Education


Cambridge Assessment International Education (informally known as Cambridge International or simply Cambridge and formerly known as CIE, Cambridge International Examinations) is a provider of international qualifications, offering examinations and qualifications to 10,000 schools in more than 160 countries.[2][3] It is part of the University of Cambridge.

Cambridge Assessment International Education
AbbreviationCIE
Formation1858[1]
Parent organisation
Cambridge Assessment
Websitewww.cambridgeinternational.org
Formerly called
(University of) Cambridge International Examinations

Abstract


Cambridge Assessment International Education is a division of Cambridge Assessment, the trading name of the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), founded in 1858[1] as a non-profit and non-teaching department of the University of Cambridge.[4][5]

Qualifications


Cambridge Assessment offers primarily school-leaving qualifications for university entrance such as the Cambridge International General Certificate of Education – Advanced Level (Cambridge International GCE A-Levels).[6] In addition, Cambridge Assessment provides Key Stage examinations for primary and secondary schools internationally.[7]

Recognition


Former logo of CIE

Cambridge qualifications are recognized for admission by all UK universities as well as universities in the United States (Stanford and all Ivy League universities), Canada, the European Union, the Middle East, West Asia, New Zealand, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Kazakhstan as well as in other countries.[8]

Partnerships


Cambridge Assessment is engaged in partnerships with governments of 25 countries on integrated curriculum and assessment design and professional development for teachers.[9]

Philanthropy


Cambridge Assessment provides charitable support for children from troubled backgrounds.[10][11]

Criticism


Cambridge Assessment International Education has been criticized for continuing its colonial educational practices in its literature curricula. A study showed that Cambridge Assessment privileges European male authors and consistently under-represents female authors from developing countries.[12]

References