Castellan

A castellan is the title used in Medieval Europe for an appointed official, a governor of a castle and its surrounding territory referred to as the castellany. The title of governor is retained in the English prison system, as a remnant of the medieval idea of the castellan as head of the local prison.[1] The word stems from the Latin Castellanus, derived from castellum "castle".[2] Sometimes also known as a constable of the castle district, the Constable of the Tower of London is, in fact, a form of castellan, with representative powers in the local or national assembly. A castellan was almost always male, but could occasionally be female, as when, in 1194, Beatrice of Bourbourg [fr; nl] inherited her father's castellany of Bourbourg upon the death of her brother, Roger.[3] Similarly, Agnes became the castellan of Harlech Castle upon the death of her husband John de Bonvillars in 1287.