Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis (St. Louis)

The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, also known as the Saint Louis Cathedral, is a cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church located in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis, Missouri. Completed in 1914, it is the mother church of the Archdiocese of St. Louis and the seat of its archbishop, currently Mitchell T. Rozanski. The cathedral is named for Saint Louis and was designated a basilica by Pope John Paul II in 1997.[3]

Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis
Location in Missouri
38°38′33″N 90°15′17″W
Location4431 Lindell Boulevard
St. Louis, Missouri
CountryUnited States
DenominationRoman Catholic Church
Websitewww.cathedralstl.org
History
StatusCathedral, minor basilica
Founded1914
ConsecratedJune 29, 1926
Architecture
Architect(s)Barnett, Haynes & Barnett
StyleNeo-Byzantine
Romanesque Revival
Groundbreaking1907
Completed1914
Construction cost$3,000,000 (1914 dollars)[1]
Specifications
Capacity2,500 (floor seating)
5,000 (including galleries)[1]
Length365 feet (111 m)
Width204 feet (62 m)
Number of domesThree
Dome height (outer)227 feet (69 m)
Dome height (inner)143 feet (44 m)
Dome diameter (inner)80 feet (24 m)
Number of spiresTwo
MaterialsGranite (exterior)
Brick, marble, mosaic tiles (interior)
Administration
ArchdioceseArchdiocese of St. Louis
Clergy
ArchbishopMost Rev. Mitchell T. Rozanski
RectorRev. Msgr. Henry J. Breier
Assistant priest(s)Rev. Zachary D. Povis
Rev. Msgr. Gregory R. Mikesch
Reference no.57[2]

The cathedral was built as a replacement for the previous Saint Louis Cathedral, now the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, located along the Mississippi River. Although workers began clearing ground for the building on May 1, 1907, dedication of the Cathedral and its first Mass did not take place until October 18, 1914, when the superstructure was complete.[4] Consecration of the church took place more than a decade later on June 29, 1926.[5] The church is known for its large mosaic installation (which is one of the largest in the Western Hemisphere[6]), burial crypts, and the addition of an outdoor sculpture to promote racial harmony.