Central Alaskan Yup'ik language

Central Alaskan Yupik, or Yupʼik (also rendered Yupik,[4] Central Yupik,[5][6] or indigenously Yugtun) is one of the languages of the Yupik family, in turn a member of the Eskimo–Aleut language group, spoken in western and southwestern Alaska. Both in ethnic population and in number of speakers, the Central Alaskan Yupik people form the largest group among Alaska Natives. As of 2010 Yupʼik was, after Navajo, the second most spoken aboriginal language in the United States.[7] Yupʼik should not be confused with the related language Central Siberian Yupik spoken in Chukotka and St. Lawrence Island, nor Naukan Yupik likewise spoken in Chukotka.

Central Alaskan Yupik
Yupʼik
Yugtun, Cugtun
Native toUnited States
Regionwestern and southwestern Alaska
EthnicityCentral Alaskan Yupik people
Native speakers
19,750[1] (2013)
Eskimo–Aleut
  • Eskimo
    • Yupik
      • Central Alaskan Yupik
Dialects
Latin, formerly the Yugtun syllabary
Official status
Official language in
 Alaska[2]
Language codes
ISO 639-3esu
Glottologcent2127
ELPCentral Alaskan Yup'ik
GlottopediaZentralalaska-Yup'ik[3]
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Yupʼik, like all Eskimo languages, is polysynthetic and uses suffixation as primary means for word formation. There are a great number of derivational suffixes (termed postbases) that are used productively to form these polysynthetic words. Yupʼik has predominantly ergative alignment: case marking follows the ergative pattern for the most part, but verb agreement can follow an ergative or an accusative pattern, depending on grammatical mood.[8] The language grammatically distinguishes three numbers: singular, dual, and plural. There is no marking of grammatical gender in the language, nor are there articles.


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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Central Alaskan Yup'ik language, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.