Chinatown

A Chinatown (Chinese: 唐人街; pinyin: Tángrénjiē; Jyutping: tong4 jan4 gaai1) is an ethnic enclave of Chinese people located outside mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore or Taiwan, most often in an urban setting. Areas known as "Chinatown" exist throughout the world, including Europe, North America, South America, Asia, Africa and Australasia.

Chinatown
Chinese唐人街
Literal meaning"Chinese Street"
Alternative Chinese name
Traditional Chinese中國城
Simplified Chinese中国城
Literal meaning"Chinatown"
Second alternative Chinese name
Traditional Chinese華埠
Simplified Chinese华埠
Literal meaning"Chinese District"

The development of most Chinatowns typically resulted from mass migration to an area without any or with very few Chinese residents. Binondo in Manila, established in 1594, is recognized as the world's oldest Chinatown. Notable early examples outside Asia include the Liverpool Chinatown in the United Kingdom, considered to be the oldest Chinatown in the western world. San Francisco's Chinatown in the United States and Melbourne's Chinatown in Australia, which were founded in the mid-19th century during the California Gold Rush and Victorian gold rush, respectively. A more modern example, in Montville, Connecticut, was caused by the displacement of Chinese workers in the Manhattan Chinatown following the September 11th attacks in 2001.[1][2]