Chinese dragon

A Chinese dragon, also known as Loong, Long or Lung, is a legendary creature in Chinese mythology, Chinese folklore, and Chinese culture at large. Chinese dragons have many animal-like forms such as turtles and fish, but are most commonly depicted as snake-like with four legs. Academicians identify four reliable theories on the origin of the Chinese dragon: snake, Chinese alligator, thunder and nature worship origin.[1] They traditionally symbolize potent and auspicious powers, particularly control over water, rainfall, typhoons, and floods. The dragon is also a symbol of power, strength, and good luck for people who are worthy of it in East Asian culture. [citation needed] During the days of Imperial China, the Emperor of China usually used the dragon as a symbol of his imperial strength and power.[2] In Chinese culture, excellent and outstanding people are compared to a dragon, while incapable people with no achievements are compared to other, disesteemed creatures, such as a worm. A number of Chinese proverbs and idioms feature references to a dragon, such as "Hoping one's child will become a dragon" (simplified Chinese: 望子成龙; traditional Chinese: 望子成龍; pinyin: wàng zǐ chéng lóng).

Qing dynasty dragon
Chinese dragon
"Dragon" in oracle bone script (top left), bronze script (top right), sea script (middle left), Traditional (middle right), Japanese new-style (shinjitai, bottom left), and Simplified (bottom right) Chinese characters
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese

Affiliated Chinese surnames include 龐 / 庞 (Dragon God, House of Dragon) and 龍 / 龙 (Dragon).