Large intestine

The large intestine, also known as the large bowel, is the last part of the gastrointestinal tract and of the digestive system in tetrapods. Water is absorbed here and the remaining waste material is stored in the rectum as feces before being removed by defecation.[1] The colon is the longest portion of the large intestine, and the terms are often used interchangeably but most sources define the large intestine as the combination of the cecum, colon, rectum, and anal canal.[1][2][3] Some other sources exclude the anal canal.[4][5][6]

Large Intestine
Front of abdomen, showing surface markings for the liver (red), and the stomach and large intestine (blue). The large intestine is like an upside down U.
Details
Part ofGastrointestinal tract
SystemDigestive system
ArterySuperior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric and iliac arteries
VeinSuperior and inferior mesenteric vein
LymphInferior mesenteric lymph nodes
Identifiers
LatinColon or intestinum crassum
MeSHD007420
TA98A05.7.01.001
TA22963
FMA7201
Anatomical terminology

In humans, the large intestine begins in the right iliac region of the pelvis, just at or below the waist, where it is joined to the end of the small intestine at the cecum, via the ileocecal valve. It then continues as the colon ascending the abdomen, across the width of the abdominal cavity as the transverse colon, and then descending to the rectum and its endpoint at the anal canal.[7] Overall, in humans, the large intestine is about 1.5 metres (5 ft) long, which is about one-fifth of the whole length of the human gastrointestinal tract.[8]


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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Large intestine, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.