Crayfish

Crayfish are freshwater crustaceans resembling small lobsters (to which they are related). In some locations, they are also known as crawfish, craydids, crawdaddies, crawdads, freshwater lobsters, mountain lobsters, rock lobsters, mudbugs, or yabbies. Taxonomically, they are members of the superfamilies Astacoidea and Parastacoidea. They breathe through feather-like gills. Some species are found in brooks and streams, where fresh water is running, while others thrive in swamps, ditches, and paddy fields. Most crayfish cannot tolerate polluted water, although some species, such as Procambarus clarkii, are hardier. Crayfish feed on animals and plants, either living or decomposing, and detritus.[1]

Crayfish
Temporal range: Barremian–recent
Northern kōura, Paranephrops planifrons (Parastacidae)
Scientific classification
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Astacoidea
Latreille, 1802
and Parastacoidea
Huxley, 1879
Families
Astacoidea
Parastacoidea
Rearing white-clawed crayfish at Cynrig hatchery, Wales. Establishing a breeding population from introduced captive-bred animals.
Mexican style Crayfish
A man selling dried crayfish at an African market

The term "crayfish" is applied to saltwater species in some countries.