Crustacean

Crustaceans (Crustacea /krʌˈstʃə/) form a large, diverse arthropod taxon which includes such animals as crabs, lobsters, crayfish, shrimps, prawns, krill, woodlice, and barnacles.[1] The crustacean group can be treated as a subphylum under the clade Mandibulata; because of recent molecular studies it is now well accepted that the crustacean group is paraphyletic, and comprises all animals in the clade Pancrustacea other than hexapods.[2] Some crustaceans (Remipedia, Cephalocarida, Malacostraca) are more closely related to insects and the other hexapods than they are to certain other crustaceans.[3]

Crustaceans
Temporal range: 511–0 Ma Cambrian to present
From left to right and from top to bottom: Grapsus grapsus (a crab), Homarus gammarus (a lobster), Procambarus clarkii (a crayfish), Lysmata amboinensis (a shrimp), Antarctic krill (a krill), Hemilepistus reaumuri (a woodlouse), Calanoida (a copepod), and Lepas anatifera (a barnacle)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Clade: Pancrustacea
Subphylum: Crustacea
Groups included

Thylacocephala? †
Branchiopoda

Phyllopoda
Sarsostraca

Remipedia
Cephalocarida
Maxillopoda

Tantulocarida
Branchiura
Pentastomida
Mystacocarida
Copepoda

Thecostraca

Ascothoracida
Cirripedia
Facetotecta

Ostracoda

Myodocopa
Podocopa

Malacostraca

Phyllocarida
Hoplocarida
Eumalacostraca
Cladistically included but traditionally excluded taxa

Hexapods

The 67,000 described species range in size from Stygotantulus stocki at 0.1 mm (0.004 in), to the Japanese spider crab with a leg span of up to 3.8 m (12.5 ft) and a mass of 20 kg (44 lb). Like other arthropods, crustaceans have an exoskeleton, which they moult to grow. They are distinguished from other groups of arthropods, such as insects, myriapods and chelicerates, by the possession of biramous (two-parted) limbs, and by their larval forms, such as the nauplius stage of branchiopods and copepods.

Most crustaceans are free-living aquatic animals, but some are terrestrial (e.g. woodlice), some are parasitic (e.g. Rhizocephala, fish lice, tongue worms) and some are sessile (e.g. barnacles). The group has an extensive fossil record, reaching back to the Cambrian, and includes living fossils such as Triops cancriformis, which has existed apparently unchanged since the Triassic period. More than 7.9 million tons of crustaceans per year are produced by fishery or farming for human consumption,[4] most of it being shrimp and prawns. Krill and copepods are not as widely fished, but may be the animals with the greatest biomass on the planet, and form a vital part of the food chain. The scientific study of crustaceans is known as carcinology (alternatively, malacostracology, crustaceology or crustalogy), and a scientist who works in carcinology is a carcinologist.