Cyril of Jerusalem

Cyril of Jerusalem (Greek: Κύριλλος Α΄ Ἱεροσολύμων, Kýrillos A Ierosolýmon; Latin: Cyrillus Hierosolymitanus; c. 313[1] 386 AD) was a theologian of the early Church. About the end of 350 AD he succeeded Maximus as Bishop of Jerusalem, but was exiled on more than one occasion due to the enmity of Acacius of Caesarea, and the policies of various emperors. Cyril left important writings documenting the instruction of catechumens and the order of the Liturgy in his day.


Cyril of Jerusalem
Bishop, Confessor and Doctor of the Church
Bornc. 313 AD
possibly near Caesarea Maritima, Syria Palaestina (Modern-day Israel)
Died386 AD (aged 73)
Jerusalem, Syria Palaestina
Venerated inCatholic Church
Eastern Catholic Churches
Eastern Orthodox Church
Oriental Orthodoxy
Anglican Communion
Lutheran Church
Feast18 March (Byzantine Christianity, Catholic Church)
7 May (Byzantine Christianity) (miracle)
Paremhat 22 (Coptic Christianity)

Cyril is venerated as a saint within the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodox Church, and the Anglican Communion. In 1883, Cyril was declared a Doctor of the Church by Pope Leo XIII. He is highly respected among Palestinian Christians.

Cyril is remembered in the Church of England with a commemoration on 18 March.[2]