Dijon mustard

Dijon mustard (French: Moutarde de Dijon) is a traditional mustard of France, named after the town of Dijon in Burgundy, France, which was the center of mustard making in the late Middle Ages and was granted exclusive rights in France in the 17th century.[1] First used in 1336 for the table of King Philip VI,[2] it became popular in 1856, when Jean Naigeon of Dijon replaced the usual ingredient of vinegar in the recipe with verjuice, the acidic juice of unripe grapes.[3]

Dijon mustard
A teaspoon of Dijon mustard
TypeCondiment
Place of originFrance
Region or stateBurgundy
Main ingredientsMustard seeds, white wine or wine vinegar, water, salt
Similar dishesCreole mustard, Kasundi
A jar of Maille brand Dijon mustard

The main ingredients of this condiment are brown mustard seeds (Brassica juncea)[4] and white wine,[5] or a mix of wine vinegar, water and salt designed to imitate the original verjuice.[6] It can be used as an accompaniment to all meats in its usual form as a paste, or it can be mixed with other ingredients to make a sauce.[7] The term Dijonnaise refers to a blend of Dijon mustard with mayonnaise.[8]