Dime (United States coin)

The dime, in United States usage, is a ten-cent coin, one tenth of a United States dollar, labeled formally as "one dime". The denomination was first authorized by the Coinage Act of 1792. The dime is the smallest in diameter and is the thinnest of all U.S. coins currently minted for circulation, being 0.705 inches (17.91 millimeters) in diameter and 0.053 in (1.35 mm) in thickness. The obverse of the current dime depicts the profile of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the reverse boasts an olive branch, a torch, and an oak branch, from left to right respectively. As of 2011, the dime coin cost 5.65 cents to produce.[1]

Dime
United States
Value0.10 U.S. dollar
Mass2.268 g (0.0729 troy oz)
Diameter17.91 mm (0.705 in)
Thickness1.35 mm (0.053 in)
Edge118 reeds
CompositionCurrent—91.67% copper, 8.33% nickel
Prior to 1965—90% silver, 10% copper
Years of minting1796–1798, 1800–1805, 1807, 1809, 1811, 1814, 1820–1825, 1827–1931, 1934–present
Catalog number
Obverse
DesignFranklin D. Roosevelt
DesignerJohn R. Sinnock
Design date1946
Reverse
DesignOlive branch, torch, oak branch
DesignerJohn R. Sinnock
Design date1946

The word dime comes from the Old French disme (Modern French dîme), meaning "tithe" or "tenth part", from the Latin decima [pars].[2] In the past prices have occasionally been quoted on signage and other materials in terms of dimes, abbreviated as "d" or a lowercase "d" with a slash through it (₫) as with the cent and mill signs. As of 2019, the dime is the only United States coin in general circulation that is not denominated in terms of dollars or cents.