Divine law

Divine law comprises any body of law that is perceived as deriving from a transcendent source, such as the will of God or gods  in contrast to man-made law or to secular law. According with Angelos Chaniotis and Rudolph F. Peters, Divine laws are typically perceived as superior to man-made laws,[1][2] sometimes due to an assumption that their source has resources beyond human knowledge and human reason.[3] Believers in divine laws might accord them greater authority than other laws,[4][5][2] for example by assuming that divine law cannot be changed by human authorities.[2]

According with Chaniotis, Divine laws are noted for their apparent inflexibility.[6] The introduction of interpretation into divine law is a controversial issue, since believers place high significance on adhering to the law precisely.[7] Opponents to the application of divine law typically deny that it is purely divine and point out human influences in the law. These opponents characterize such laws as belonging to a particular cultural tradition. Conversely, adherents of divine law are sometimes reluctant to adapt inflexible divine laws to cultural contexts.[8]

Medieval Christianity assumed the existence of three kinds of laws: divine law, natural law, and man-made law.[4] Theologians have substantially debated the scope of natural law, with the Enlightenment encouraging greater use of reason and expanding the scope of natural law and marginalizing divine law in a process of secularization.[9][additional citation(s) needed] Since the authority of divine law is rooted[colloquialism] in its source, the origins and transmission-history of divine law are important.[10][lower-alpha 1]

Conflicts frequently[quantify] arise between secular understandings of justice or morality and divine law.[11][12]

Religious law, such as canon law, includes both divine law and additional interpretations, logical extensions, and traditions.[5]